Panasonic S1H – The First Netflix Approved Mirrorless Camera

October 29th, 2019 icon / message-square 11
Panasonic S1H - The First Netflix Approved Mirrorless Camera

There are no doubts the Panasonic S1H is a competent camera and to make things even better, Netflix just approved the Panasonic S1H as the first mirrorless camera that can shoot Netflix 4k Originals contents. For our complete S1H camera coverage, please head to our review by clicking here and our lab test by clicking here

PanasonicS1H_NetflixApproved_Featured

The Panasonic S1H Is Netflix Approved

Netflix has just announced that the Panasonic S1H is Netflix Approved to shoot Netflix 4k Originals content. That means that the S1H is the first mirrorless camera delivering “good enough” quality for shooting the high-quality programming the video streaming leader demands. Even more impressive is the fact that it can do it internally, without the use of an external video recorder.

PanasonicS1H_NetflixApproved_01

Image credit: Netflix

As you can see, Netflix advises that you shoot in 4K DCI or UHD, using either the Full Frame sensor or the S35mm mode. Also, you have to shoot in the V-Log picture profile, using a 4:2:2 10bit ALL-I codec at 400 Mbps.

Most of the cameras that are Netflix Approved are usually high-end cinema cameras like the ARRI Alexa LF, RED cameras, the Canon C500/C700, and so on (please see this link for the complete list). These cinema cameras use proprietary media, high-speed memory cards like CFexpress/CFast cards, or high-end video recorders to store the footage. But, the Panasonic S1H uses affordable UHS-II SD cards, like the EVA-1.

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Image credit: Netflix

The only limitation is for slow-motion recording, up to 60 frames per second in 4K DCI/UHD. If you want to shoot in “high-speed mode,” you have to use an external recorder that can record the HDMI output of the S1H in 4:2:2 10bit.

This certification means that the Panasonic S1H can be a perfect A-Camera on a budget for filmmakers that want to sell their content to Netflix. Also, it means that the S1H can be a nice B-Camera – and even crash camera – alongside a more feature-full cinema camera. In fact, the S1H is the most affordable option on the Netflix certified list.

What do you think of this Netflix certification of the S1H? Did you already shot content for Netflix? Let us know in the comments!

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Geoffrey Reacher
Geoffrey Reacher
Guest
October 31st, 2019

I thought the S1H has non-defeatable temporal noise reduction? If so, you can’t comply with Netflix’s instruction to turn off noise reduction on the S1H.

 Keith Davidf
Keith Davidf
Member
October 31st, 2019

All those making a film for Nexflix raise your hand. I count zero. This is about marketing and not about filmaking.

Daniel
Daniel
Guest
May 13th, 2020
Reply to  Keith Davidf

If Netflix approves a camera at this price point, you had better believe some people will use it to make Netflix original films. So, Netflix has conaiderable risk here, and they believe the S1H has the goods.

BrewD.o.p
BrewD.o.p
Guest
October 30th, 2019

This list gets funnier every year : so the S1H is approved but not the Arri Amira because yeah it’s only 3.2k pixels who cares about the Arri color science ;)

Paolo Mugnaini
Guest
October 29th, 2019

I don’t know why netflix does not have the iPhone 8 plus on it. High Flying Bird was shot with it and it’s there, along with the giant pixelated images in low light.

Dan Brockett
Dan Brockett
Guest
October 29th, 2019

Netflix technical specs only apply to Netflix Commissioned Work (Netflix Originals). Seriously doubt if many Netflix Originals will be hot to shoot on a $4,000.00 consumer camera unless it’s as a car/plant/crash cam? Maybe some low end documentaries but not sure if Netflix actually commissions many documentaries?

Markus Magnon
Guest
October 29th, 2019
Reply to  Dan Brockett

Exactly. I think cinema5d should not jump on the hype train what is or what is not approved by NETFLIX. For visitors of this site… just keep on shooting with any camera you want. If it is good Netflix might buy it. And they don´t care if it was shooting on the old Blackmagic Pocket in 1080p. Or 5D Mark II. Like “Frances Ha” from 2012. In cinema, 2k is the norm. So why not spend time thinking about “true 2k” image… And talking about cinema standards instead of netflix standards. If you produce for Netflix… get an ARRI Mini. I doubt they will use a Mirrorless to shoot every single scene. Talking about “Netflix approved cameras” is kinda silly.

Admin
October 29th, 2019
Reply to  Markus Magnon

Nothing to do with hype train – we clearly wrote it’s only about Netflix Originals, their own commissioned content, which is most of what they feature on their streaming channel anyway, and most of the rest isn’t “indie content” but from the big studios.

Markus Magnon
Guest
October 29th, 2019
Reply to  Nino Leitner

Well. On facebook but also in many forums people talk about a lot if Camera A or B is Netflix approved or not. A lot of people thought “braw” is not allowed. (But it is). And now I see the title: “Panasonic S1H – The First Netflix Approved Mirrorless Camera” and those huge “NETFLIX” letters. I am not sure if this should be “big news” at all. If you are doing a Netflix production it is interesting to talk with a DoP about smaller Cameras and what is on the approved list. But for the cinema5d audience those news will only fire up the “This camera IS Netflix approved and this other camera is not” so “my camera is better than yours” because Netflix feels the same ;) A camera is just a tool and This camera is on the Netflix list. ok. I am not really sure why this camera and not another camera. Maybe get some interview with someone from Netflix. That would be interesting. But to say “Cam A is now on the list”. And it is the first mirrorless cam which is netflix approved. This is just “tech-masturbation”.

Admin
October 29th, 2019
Reply to  Dan Brockett

And that’s exactly what we wrote – Netflix Originals, which is commissioned work! Of course they can’t and won’t control what stuff is shot on that wasn’t originally shot for Netflix.

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