A Lot of Films at Sundance Festival Edited on Adobe Premiere Pro CC

January 23rd, 2016 icon / message-square 16
A Lot of Films at Sundance Festival Edited on Adobe Premiere Pro CC

North America’s most eagerly anticipated film festival is now under way. For 30 years, the Sundance Festival has highlighted the work of American and international filmmakers alike. Countless attendees have reveled in the creativity and brilliance that has been displayed annually since 1985. In the year of the festival’s origin, the Coen brothers’ debut film Blood Simple was the talk of the town—3 decades later, Adobe Premiere Pro seems to be having a similar effect!

Adobe has a lot to shout about with regards to this year’s Sundance festival. It seems that Premiere Pro—and the rest of the Creative Cloud platform—have been making waves this year, with a recent announcement stating that a total of 51 films that are debuting at this year’s indie-loving event. What’s more, the festival, which highlights some of the biggest and brightest emerging talent from the filmmaking industry, is set to showcase a total of 175 films which have utilized Adobe’s software.

In case you enjoy the numbers game, that’s apparently a 143% increase in usage since last year’s Sundance. I’d be willing to bet that there are a few smiling faces at Adobe right now!

One thing that will certainly please the folks at Adobe is the fact that it is not just the indie Sundance talent that has converted to Premiere Pro. Nope, some of Hollywood’s biggest hitters have crossed over to the Creative Cloud, too.

adobe premiere pro sundance festival

Sundance Festival 2016’s Creative Crowd

As I’ve already alluded to, there’s been a bit of traffic headed in Adobe’s direction from former Avid and Final Cut maestros—including the likes of four-time Oscar-winners the Coen brothers and Deadpool director Tim Miller. Adobe Premiere Pro has made that much of a stir that Miller, along with Deadpool’s editing consultant and workflow specialist Vashi Nedomansky, will be going into more detail as to why they’ve made the switch in Adobe’s panel—Editorial Secrets From “Hail, Caesar!” And “Deadpool”—which is scheduled for 15:30-16:30, January 23rd.

Thankfully, for those of us who are unable to attend, Adobe are making a recording available at www.adobe.com/go/video.

Regarding Adobe Premiere Pro, Miller said “Adobe really revamped Premiere Pro CC from the ground up. I love the interoperability with other programs like After Effects CC and the ability to do quick composites,” he then went on to add “we need an uninterrupted workflow between the idea and output. Premiere Pro CC is clean and fast, which is what I want.”

Of course, it’s not just film-industry elites making the switch, plenty of Sundance Festival 2016’s indie productions used Adobe’s creative software. With everything from in-competition feature films like Christine and Swiss Army Man to documentaries and shorts such as Richard Linklater – Dream is Destiny, Adobe’s Creative Cloud video tools have impacted on plenty of the Sundance Festival filmmakers’ workflow.

“Our story relies on combining decades-old archival footage with interviews from the present. We cut the film in Adobe Premiere Pro CC with incredible results,” explained Louis Black, co-director of Richard Linklater – Dream is Destiny.

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Adobe’s Investment in the Future of Filmmaking

This year, Adobe are sponsoring the NEXT category of films—a category of outspoken works which combine digital technology with uninhibited creativity. NEXT embodies the innovative, bold spirit that is ubiquitous among indie filmmakers—it looks to revolutionize the next generation of filmmaking in a way that is truly unique.

In a further move to get the word out about up-and-coming filmmakers, Adobe has also partnered with Sundance Ignite, via Project 1324—an initiative designed to provide promising young talent a chance at spotlighting their projects. The winners of this initiative will go on to receive a Sundance Ignite Fellowship, which comes with opportunities to work with—and learn from—Sundance alumni.

What’s next for the Creative Cloud?

So, what’s in the pipeline following Adobe’s Sundance success?

Fortunately for the recent converts, as well as current users of the Creative Cloud, Adobe won’t be resting on their laurels. As impressive as the numbers are for this year’s festival, it seems that Adobe is aiming higher for next year’s outing.

Some of Creative Cloud’s video tools are due an update before the end of January, and here’s a taste of what’s to come:

  • General performance enhancements within the cloud, most noticeably to Premiere Pro
  • 100,000 4K high-quality video assets are to be added to the video content available in Adobe Stock. Premiere Pro and After Effects CC users will have the ability to search, download, and license the assets available on Adobe Stock. This feature is already a part of Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator
  • The Cineware Live 3D pipeline is set to be enhanced with improved workflow and performance. For the first time, OpenGL rendering will be available, with vast improvements in speed over the current software rendering option
  • Compositing will become more efficient, thanks to Live Link allowing the synchronization of the timelines between After Effects CC and Cinema 4D
  • Specific Takes can be rendered from within a Cinema 4D project file

Does the Festival’s Love of the Cloud Indicate a Lasting Trend?

Whether you’re an Avid fan, a Final Cut follower, or an Adobe junkie, one thing is undeniable. An increase in Adobe CC use of 143% is certainly an impressive feat. Could this be indicative of a power shift in the world of video editing for professionals and amateurs alike?

Who knows? It is certainly exciting to think of a world where Avid Media Composer has some serious competition—and maybe Adobe’s Sundance success can be what spurs them on to really take their video editing software to the next level!

Either way, I am looking forward to seeing the quality that Premiere Pro has been producing lately—and thanks to Sundance Festival 2016, I’ll have 175 opportunities to find out!

Do you think that Adobe could be tipping the scales of video editing in their favor? Have you tried using Premiere Pro recently and if so, how was it? Let us know in the comments!

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 Bernard Shaw
Bernard Shaw
Member
January 26th, 2016

Look good site, but enough of this PR stuff PLEASE!

We use all the NLE’s we are storytellers who use tools, not tool freaks who are religious converts to companies for god sake.

I am NOT a Adobe guy a FCPX guy etc. I am a Film Maker, who as Frank Capra said the only sin is dullness.

This is DULLNESS guys

T F
T F
Member
January 25th, 2016

+1 for Creative Cloud here. Our studio switched a few years ago and it’s been mostly great. A lot of it may depend on your workflow and what cameras you are shooting on. We don’t normally edit raw video, and that may be a pain point for some. Runs very smooth for us with 4K FS7 and URSA footage. No editing platform is perfect, in 12 years as a full time editor I’ve never encountered a NLE that didn’t crash from time to time. Yes, even AVID systems. Unfortunately, troubleshooting that BS is part of the job.

Member
January 25th, 2016

I appreciated the article. It reinforced what I already knew. It did feel like a press release for Adobe, and you should probably seek compensation. ;)

Film Industry editors were left in the dark after Apple consumerized FCP with X. The choice was to go back to AVID or try Adobe. Adobe is the perfect solution for indie editors especially in Creative Suite. As far as rendering times, sounds like someone needs to update their machine to a more powerful edit system.

DaVinci is a great platform, especially when your digital film has been shot on a Red and I’d love to learn more about it.

But most importantly, why so much hate? Did your mom not hold you enough?

 Martijn Schroevers
Martijn Schroevers
Member
January 25th, 2016
Reply to  Dave Sapp

No hate, just obsoleteness. Premiere ‘Pro’ CC is yesteryears editing software just like AVID. Basically has not changed over 30 years!! FCPX is used all over the world by Pro’s and once you take the step you never want back to a static timeline. Not to mention that I paid once $299 for my license four years ago and had every update since for free. A mere $6 a month… eat that Adobe!

Member
January 25th, 2016

The magnetic timeline of FcX is its best feature and its achilles heal. Its quick its fast its intuitive. Good for min docs and commercials. But when your timeline grows past a certain size it turns into a spiderweb where it is hard to distinguish relationships at a glance or even staring. A traditional timeline makes more sense and is easier to work for many people especially with size.
Looking for work arounds for professional software like Photoshop or After Effects once you make it past your “boot strap” stage of business building is stupid silly. It says a lot about your character when you invest in yourself and the tools that you use.

Anonymous
Anonymous
Guest
January 24th, 2016

Wow. A lot of hate in these comments. Adobe is the best platform out there, especially if you need to incorporate effects and photos and pro-audio into your project. (So, everyone.)

I appreciate this coverage. Thanks.

 Martijn Schroevers
Martijn Schroevers
Member
January 24th, 2016
Reply to  Anonymous

No hate here Brandon. There is just no objective news in this post. I suspect Adobe has payed for it in one way or another and that is not the kind of coverage I love from Cinema 5D. I can’t find any reason you would appreciate it other than when you’re an Adobe employee…

Member
January 25th, 2016
Reply to  Tom Price

I expect a magazine like Cinema5D to report on trends in the “film” industry. Sundance is a good barometer of what is happening with independent and lower budget Hollywood productions. I’m happy that Adobe is taking their subscribers seriously and continually improving their product. Adobe CC will certainly let you know if your computer is a dog and needs to RIP along with the other antiques like FC7 and anything CS6. The old code in AE was replaced recently and PR needed it. I had PR crash on me 3 times today, so I welcome the new code under the hood. I hear your prayers for Avid to be listening, watching and keeping up.
Don’t apologize to the blanket haters who won’t let you know the problems that need to be solved.

Steve >
Steve >
Guest
January 25th, 2016
Reply to  Tom Price

Yeah, but 8 links to BHPhoto Premiere Elements listings is a little excessive, no?

Brandon Herman
Guest
January 24th, 2016

Even as an Adobe fanboy I didn’t know we were getting updates this month, so that was great to hear. I’m also glad that people who didn’t know it already might have learned that major films are being cut in Premiere; that makes it easier for me to sell my services to people who until recently were listing “must know Final Cut” in their job listings.

I also had been looking forward to some more info on how “Hail, Caeser!” (and “Deadpool”) used it; so the link to the seminar is useful.

There wasn’t a lot of editorializing. I’m ok with that. People seem annoyed that this is simply a list of facts; maybe it *was* culled together from a few press releases. But I don’t get Adibe press releases sent to me so I appreciated it.

 Martijn Schroevers
Martijn Schroevers
Member
January 24th, 2016

Is Cinema 5D becoming a sponsored news platform?? Yuk!

Member
January 24th, 2016

Is this an Adobe press release?

Trevor Meier
Trevor Meier
Member
January 23rd, 2016

Guys… it’s fine to do a post about a specific platform, but this kind of copy-and-paste from their PR people really makes you look bad. At least show it as a “sponsored post” or something like that

 Markus Magnon
Markus Magnon
Member
January 23rd, 2016

All my friends who switched to CC (Cloud) hated it.
Sorry. Yes. many films are made with Adobe CC. I don’t care.

Cinema5d .. whats going on to post something like this an write: “General performance enhancements within the cloud, most noticeably to Premiere Pro CC”

WTF? “performance enhancements” … because of what?
I don’t care about Link to AE and Cinema4D.

I’m using Adobe Premiere CS6… but rendering but love the GPU realtime rendering perfomance in Davinci Resolve. Its 100x times faster. Adobe “invented” DNG… but there are third part tools whiich handles DNG files better than Adobe itself. I I still hat the “Media Player Endcoder” with all the youtube presets in it. There are 100 presets. And the rendering is so slow.

Adobe is getting worse and worse.. first with the “Adobe Suits”… I remembered times as Photoshop was only 400 MB big. Now its 4, 5 GB and fucking slow. Sorry. When i read “performance enhancements” … i’m just speechless.

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