Aputure Deity Shotgun Mic Competes With the Sennheiser MKH416

January 16th, 2017
Aputure Deity Shotgun Mic Competes With the Sennheiser MKH416

The Aputure Deity is a shotgun condenser mic which comes at a very competitive price point, and seems to offer all the features you expect from a broadcast-grade mic.

Aputure DeityThe Aputure Deity Shotgun Mic

Aputure has entered yet another market, and this time the company is aiming at an industry legend: the Sennheiser MKH 416 shotgun mic. In fact, if you’ve ever worked with a MKH416, you’ll notice the Aputure Deity actually looks quite similar. Watch the introduction video from Aputure below:

This new microphone seems to be built like a tank: CNC machined from solid brass, it looks like it will be capable of taking quite a bit of beating while in use in the field. The whole unit is very rugged and even waterproof to a certain extent.

The Aputure Deity works with a so-called supercardioid polar pattern, so it’s very directional. Any sounds coming from sources other than the one you’re poining the microphone at will be very low in volume, making it a perfect choice for shooting interviews, for example.

Aputure DeityBeing a condenser microphone, the Aputure Deity needs 48V phantom power from the camera or recording device you’re using it with. The majority of available recorders do provide phantom power so this shouldn’t be a problem. In terms of features, the Aputure Deity is very close to its obvious competitor, the Sennheiser MKH 416 shotgun mic. However, the Deity will set you back only a third of the cash required for a MKH 416.

This microphone seems to be a very decent choice indeed. Let’s have a look at this review by Curtis Judd – however we can’t give our personal opinion about it until we have reviewed it ourselves, which we plan to do as soon as we get our hands on a review unit.

Specifications and Availability

Given its competitive price point and features, I think the Aputure Deity is well worth a closer look. It comes in two different kits: the basic kit contains the Deity itself, a basic mirophone clamp and a windshield, everything packed in a nice waterproof case. The Deity Location Kit extends the basic kit with a Rycote shockmount and a fluffy windscreen.

Aputure Deity

  • Hyper Cardiod polar pattern
  • Low inherent self-noise
  • 130 dB SPL (@1kHz, 1% THD into 1 kΩ)
  • No low-cut / hi-pass
  • Good handling noise
  • Rugged build quality and water resistance
  • Dimensions: 19mm x 250mm (same as Sennheiser MKH 416)
  • 24V or 48V phantom power is required

The Aputure Deity is available now and the price is $359 for the basic kit and $429 for the location kit. You can read more about it on the Aputure Website.

What is your favorite microphone in the field? Let us know in the comments below!

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Microphones – Let's Break it DownPalmer Woodrow Recent comment authors
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Adam Loretz
Adam Loretz
GuestJanuary 16th, 2017

Aggressive pricing. Be good to see and hear it in a comparative test with a 416 and maybe a Rode ntg 3

Nino Leitner
Nino Leitner
GuestJanuary 16th, 2017

That’s exactly what we intend to do

Adam Loretz
Adam Loretz
GuestJanuary 16th, 2017

Nino Leitner ?fab

Martin Wöhrer
Martin Wöhrer
GuestJanuary 16th, 2017

If you have them available it would be great to also throw in the Schoeps CMIT and the MKH 8060. It would be nice to see how the low cost mics can hold up to the top of the range.

Nino Leitner
Nino Leitner
GuestJanuary 16th, 2017

Martin Wöhrer Happy to have you test me, Martin! You’re a sound expert, I am not.

Andre Penso
Andre Penso
GuestJanuary 16th, 2017

Zachary Nicholson thoughts?

Palmer Woodrow
Palmer Woodrow
MemberJanuary 17th, 2017

That’s not a comment.

ewa sklodowska
MemberJanuary 16th, 2017

Great timing as I’m about to decide which mic to buy for my productions. Waiting for a comparison between the 416 and ntg3 Thanks!

Palmer Woodrow
Palmer Woodrow
MemberJanuary 25th, 2017

There’s a very good comparison of those two online somewhere already. I studied it before buying my NTG3. I’ll see if I can find it for you.

Palmer Woodrow
Palmer Woodrow
MemberJanuary 25th, 2017

I don’t think this is the same one I saw before, but here’s a comparison: https://audioboom.com/posts/2184980-sennheiser-mkh-416-p48-vs-rode-ntg-3-shotgun-mic

David Peterson - "Sound Speeds!"
MemberJanuary 26th, 2017

That really isn’t a great comparison for a shotgun boom mic, as there is much more which goes into a good one than just how it performs in a carefully controlled circumstances.

When the better ones shine through is when you need to boom half a dozen actors at once who are improvising their lines all while in an uncontrolled location which was poorly chosen by the location scout (because there wasn’t one). Then you’ll see the quality of a high end one vs a cheaper microphone show through.

Palmer Woodrow
Palmer Woodrow
MemberJanuary 26th, 2017

Yeah, I think it’s a pretty good comparison for matching the timbre of one mic to the other.

And most people are interested in the directionality of a shotgun mic, which is not going to serve well for miking half a dozen people at once.

Don’t you think?

David Peterson - "Sound Speeds!"
MemberJanuary 28th, 2017

I referenced several people there as I’m referring to how you’d use a boom mic in reality on a set, it is not like this test where you’ve got it perfectly set up!

And neither does this test reveal how good it is at directionality, with its side rejection.

All this test does is look at one very small aspect of a microphone’s performance, which is helpful, but by no means anywhere near enough to make a definitive decision on one microphone vs another.

(but btw I do think the NTG3 is a very strong substitute choice for the 416 at a lower price, but I just wanted to highlight there is more to a microphone than just that test)

Claude Sadik
MemberJanuary 16th, 2017

I’m no expert but was thinking about buying a Rode NTG2. I see you’re going to compare it to the NTG3. Any chance you can compare it to the NTG2 as well? It’s closer in price ! Cheers :)

David Peterson - "Sound Speeds!"
MemberJanuary 25th, 2017

The gap between the NTG2 and NTG3 is very large, which makes me inclined to think that surely the Aputure Deity will be a better buy over the NTG2. (but is it better than NTG3?? I dunno, doubtful, at best it might be not better but just be “different”)

Claude Sadik
MemberJanuary 25th, 2017

Yes from what I’m reading online I should go for the NTG3 rather than the NTG2 but it’s much more expensive. I’m waiting for Cinema5D’s review to see if this Aputure mic could be a viable middle ground option for me!

David Peterson - "Sound Speeds!"
MemberJanuary 25th, 2017

I reckon it is 100% worth it if you can swing the extra money!

Audio gear is hardly like when you buy a camera body that gets outdated in 6 months. There are many sound recordists out there still using microphones they purchased ten, twenty or even thirty years ago!!

Personally I’m about to buy a Sanken CS-3e which I reckon is one of the best shotguns there are, but I’m considering grabbing a Aputure Deity as a backup extra microphone on the side. (though I hardly need it…. :-P Already have a NTG2 and ME66!)

Mark Tierney
Mark Tierney
GuestJanuary 16th, 2017

“Competes with” ha!

Marcus V Warner
Marcus V Warner
GuestJanuary 17th, 2017

I might pick one up to do a comparison between between my 416.

Ian Hunter
MemberJanuary 18th, 2017

Audio is an area that has fallen far behind the innovation curve when compared to cameras. It’s inconceivable that we’re still having to use clumsy, multi-faceted wired lapels/receivers, for example.

Palmer Woodrow
Palmer Woodrow
MemberJanuary 18th, 2017

As opposed to what?

 Peter Harkness
Peter Harkness
MemberJanuary 18th, 2017

Camera-mounted, infrared, line-of-sight devices that auto-detect faces, pick-up air vibrations from an extremely narrow area around the mouth, and use real-time user-adjustable noise cancellation to reject other sounds.

The above, but on a whisper-quiet battery-powered drone the size of a mouse that will position itself at user-selectable distances from any subject.

Wireless, flexible, omni-directional mic tabs that do not transmit surface noise and pick up air vibrations in roughly the 500Hz-3000Hz range.

Extremely small sized wireless mic appliances that fit inside the mouth.

You are welcome to patent any/all of the above ideas and become a billionaire.

Palmer Woodrow
Palmer Woodrow
MemberJanuary 19th, 2017

Ha ha ha! OK, I’ll get started on the paperwork!

Ian Hunter
MemberJanuary 19th, 2017

;) But we are working on intelligent mic strips, colthlike adhesives that record voice only.

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