Infrared Apple Patent Granted To Disable iPhone Camera

June 30th, 2016
Infrared Apple Patent Granted To Disable iPhone Camera

A US Apple patent has been granted to disable the use of your camera phone through the use of infrared technology. The patent, if implemented, is targeted towards the filming of live concerts and other ‘sensitive’ subjects where filming is either not authorised or frowned upon.

Phone at Concert

Anyone attending a concert over the last two years I’m sure will be familiar with this sight. It’s something that has caused frustration within the music industry, as it causes the audience to focus more on capturing an even rather than experiencing it.

An Apple patent filed a few years ago has now been granted that may combat this.

“The image processing circuitry can determine whether each image detected by the camera includes an infrared signal with encoded data. If the image processing circuitry determines that an image includes an infrared signal with encoded data, the circuitry may route at least a portion of the image (e.g., the infrared signal) to circuitry operative to decode the encoded data.”

How Does The Apple Patent Work?

It’s pretty simple. Event locations would have an infrared transmitter that emits a signal. Your iPhone camera would detect this and simply disable the captured photography and video by either blurring parts of the image or generally preventing you from taking any type of camera recording.

Infrared Apple

Why Does It Matter?

This is considered a good move in many regards for live concerts: many will see this as a way of enjoying a concert/event for what it’s worth. However this is technology that could easily get misused. There are many buildings within cities that are deemed private and where direct and purposeful photography is prohibited. Granting use of this technology here could have an impact on the public right to capture photo and video; a city could become a minefield of black spots where you can’t capture anything with your phone.

City Selfie

There’s no immediate threat of us not being able to take holiday snaps of loved ones freely on a city break, and there’s no confirmation that this will actually gain traction or even be implemented at live concerts as it’s been intended. Many of these patents are filed by large companies and never carried through. But it’s an interesting insight into what could be the future of control on capturing technology.

Let us know in the comments what you think of this development …

via/ PetaPixel

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Michael Jessica Poff
Guest
July 3rd, 2016

What if I were to use an IR filter so it didn’t even receive the encoded IR signal saying, no go?

Ron Howard
Guest
July 1st, 2016

I can see the reasoning behind this. How can one enjoy a concert with hundreds of phones in the air. I was at a hawaiian luau years ago and this lady in the front held up a damn ipad through most of the show. It was so annoying. If the kids don’t like this technology they can always go back to film. Now, there’s progress. ;-)

Nino Leitner
Guest
July 1st, 2016
Reply to  Ron Howard

To welcome something like this just because of concerts is incredibly short-sighted. Imagine protests, acts of civil courage, and so on …. if there is a way to prevent masses from filming with their phones, it will be misused at some point, either by autocratic governments or corporations.

Ron Howard
Guest
July 1st, 2016
Reply to  Ron Howard

I agree but like I said try controlling film cameras. There will always be a way around it. Whether it is hacking or better technology or older technology I can’t see the masses being shut out. We are in the information age and there is no going back.

 paolo baroni
paolo baroni
Guest
July 1st, 2016

GREAT this will bring back professionalism and get rid of all the pseudo-fotographers around the world – PHOTOGRAPHY COULD GO BACK TO WHAT IT WAS: ART not the stupid social network reality

Member
July 1st, 2016

IR filter then?

Randall O
Randall O
Guest
July 1st, 2016

And tomorrow the police and government will disable recording of daily events that could be used to prove someone’s innocence.
This will be the ultimate use (abuse) of this technology.

Melindra Bourne
Guest
July 1st, 2016

Bye bue Apple products then.
If I pay for functions I get to use them whenever I want.

The nerve of these companies.

Sergio
Sergio
Member
June 30th, 2016

What about public health risks? Blasting high amounts IR to cover an entire arena does not sound safe for the eyes. I have seen some IR emitting LED devices with the warning “Do not look directly into IR emitters”…

Emmanuel Pampuri
Guest
June 30th, 2016

We Will pur Some tape on the receiver !

 Joseph Castleberry
Joseph Castleberry
Member
June 30th, 2016

Yea, i’m sure Apple might also assume that the simple fix for this, is people making the switch from using their products.

 Antoine vdS
Antoine vdS
Member
June 30th, 2016

Information is the key of freedom, I hope that any system that prevent human to capture and share contant will be dismissed.

Crimson Son
Crimson Son
Member
June 30th, 2016
Reply to  Antoine vdS

Every freedom is not absolute. Even then, the artist has the right to charge for their work. Just like you are able to charge your client for your work.
I assume you don’t work for free.

And we are talking about entertainment here.

Rich Harris
Guest
June 30th, 2016

The kids won’t put up with that sh*t.

Emmanuel Pampuri
Guest
June 30th, 2016

Crazy world !!!

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