Pirates Of The Caribbean Spent $2 Million on Meals

June 15th, 2017
Pirates Of The Caribbean Spent $2 Million on Meals

For the latest Pirates Of The Caribbean film: “Dead Men Tell No Tales” — the budget for food alone was a reported $2 million. With a less-than-stellar 32% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, it might be time to re-evaluate how studios are translating their budgets to the big screen. 

Image Credit: Disney

The Hollywood Reporter recently interviewed Pirates actor Jack Davenport on the snack situation on the set of Pirates: 

“I remember saying to him [the chef] one day ‘What is your budget for all this?’ He looked me square in the eye and said ‘essentially unlimited.’ I was like ‘what does that mean?’ He was like ‘I don’t know, $2 million.’ I was like ‘For snacks?’ And he was like ‘yeah?’ That sounds frivolous but it wasn’t. He obviously had to keep people fed. The point is that was just a snack line item.” – Jack Davenport.

First off: yes, the crew for these films are gigantic and they deserve to be fed well for working long and hard days, but there has to be a limit. During the Sony Pictures hack in late 2014 we learned that Sony spent $74,000 on two trained tigers being used on set. At least the money ended up on the screen in that instance.

Here are a few other crazy Hollywood budget line items:

  • 46 second Plane Crash cut from the film Sahara: $2 Million
  • Deleted Rogue Scenes from X-Men: Days of Future Past: Estimated $22 million
  • Cut Third Act from World War Z: Estimated $20 million
  • Helicopter Scene from the 2001 film Swordfish: $13 million

Don’t worry though, studios are trying to cut budgets. Take the Bond film Spectre for example: MGM suggested cutting the number of train carriages from four to three in order to save money during an opening sequence.

With budgets ballooning out of control we need to focus on the actual craft of moviemaking and telling compelling stories that audiences want to see.

Prime example: The indie mindset is alive and well in films like last year’s Oscar-winning Moonlight, with a reported production budget of 1.5 million. With studio film budgets again and again cresting that 200 million mark it might be worth examining if the money is being spent in the right places on these pictures.

What do you think? Is money being spent in the best places on these big budget blockbusters? Comment below!

Source: Huffington Post /The Hollywood Reporter

28
Leave a reply

guest
1
1
- 2
Filter:
all
Sort by:
latest
 Christopher Francis
Member
June 18th, 2017

eh, interesting tidbits of info here, but forming opinions on how other people should spend their money is a very slippery slope.

probably best if we all focus on what we have to work with do the best with it.

Member
June 17th, 2017

Another extremely daft article, way to go guys…

Member
June 17th, 2017

WTF? Really, Cinema 5D is now a tabloid. Please. Anyone with a brain knows that producers try to make these things as profitable as possible. If you’ve ever worked on a big budget show, that number is no big deal. Get back to real stories. C5D, I’m gonna say it, shame on you for stooping this low.

Yannick Giraud
Guest
June 16th, 2017

Hedwig van Mechelen Brecht Visser

Myles Thompson
Guest
June 16th, 2017

I think you need to look at the actual budget in detail and compare it to similar-sized production budgets to fully understand it rather than just extrapolating unsubstantiated figures at random. Also – it seems odd to complain about a very large top-notch cast and crew apparently getting quality food while working long hours on location on a major Hollywood production. Might be more of a news-worthy scandal in the filmmaking community if the food budget was low and the staff were being mistreated/neglected.

 Richard Swearinger
Richard Swearinger
Member
June 16th, 2017

When you have people working 14- and 18-hour days, they deserve to eat decent chow. And good food is pretty expensive—both for the raw materials and the cooking talent.

Now, as for “have Hollywood budgets gone too high”?
No.
This question gets trotted out about every 10 or 15 years when some feature goes fantastically over its budget. Everyone conveniently forgets that out-of-control spending has given us some great films—Days of Heaven, Apocalypse Now, Jaws, and Titanic, as well as horrors like Evan Almighty. And actually I liked most of John Carter On Mars.
Hollywood budgets have not gotten too high. No one is holding a gun to the producers’ heads and making them sign checks. They do it because they are born gamblers and they know the rewards for throwing money at the right film are very high.

JaiJai JaiJai
Guest
June 16th, 2017

You have to understand also the location of the shoot and the cost of living. If you shoot on 1st world countries, expect food allowance per head is above $100 or even more. But if you shoot on 3rd world countries, $100 can feed more than 2 people with good quality food.

But this is an interesting topic to ready :)

Lars Nikolay Riksheim
Guest
June 15th, 2017

Berre og høyne budsjettet på filmen Ole-Andre Rønneberg ??

Ben J
Ben J
Member
June 15th, 2017

Roughly how much Depp spent on wine during the same period.

Axel Arzola
Guest
June 15th, 2017

With a $230MM (estimated) budget the 2Mil for food seems very reasonable.

 Dan Brockett
Dan Brockett
Member
June 15th, 2017

Not understanding, the headline contradicts the article copy. “Feeding people” on set are meals and craft services. “Snacks” would be craft services only, not including catering. Feeding 200-300 crew people per day, plus I am sure there were days with a dozens to thousands of extras, times a how long shoot? Assuming this budget is meals and craft services, doesn’t seem out of line. Probably at least 2-3 month shoot, perhaps longer? As a producer, could probably be done cheaper but that is a small cost on a 200 million dollar feature. Hollywood is 99% about tentpole franchises, this is what it takes to make them.

Crunch some numbers, assume a 90 day shoot with an average crew and cast of 200. That’s $22,222.00 per day for catering and craft services. Break it down, that’s $111.00 per day, per head. For three meals and craft services, that’s not bad at all. Crews work and travel on their stomachs. While union crew make good money while working, nobody is getting rich here, so having quality food and not pizza or crap while you are working is expected.

Benny Ong
Guest
June 15th, 2017

What? For the entire production? Why not? Disney is funding it. The entire production budget is well over $200m, so what’s $2m for food to feed the cast and crew? These movies are massive with lots of people on set.

Chris Reynolds
Guest
June 15th, 2017

‘An army marches on its stomach’

Joe Baker
Guest
June 15th, 2017

I can only imagine the dietary restrictions

Jason Berardi
Guest
June 15th, 2017
Reply to  Joe Baker

When they shot Spiderman 2 in town, the convention center managed all of the food. It was a giant buffet 3 times a day. We ate like kings!

Jack Albano
Guest
June 15th, 2017

Who cares what Rotten Tomatoes says I liked the film

Jason Berardi
Guest
June 15th, 2017

200 plus people on set at any given time. It’s not cheap to feed folks.

Óskar Arnarson
Guest
June 15th, 2017
Reply to  Jason Berardi

Exactly. If it’s an 80 day shoot for example. This would mean there’s a 125 dollar budget per day for each crew member. Assuming it’s 200 people. The money piles up fast. It could of course be way lower but it’s not hard to see how they reached that budget.

A more interesting question: Do you honestly need a 200 people crew to make a great film?

Jason Berardi
Guest
June 15th, 2017
Reply to  Jason Berardi

Óskar Arnarson I’ve worked on a few blockbuster features, we were second unit and there were 200+ involved daily.

Óskar Arnarson
Guest
June 15th, 2017
Reply to  Jason Berardi

I know. I’ve been involved with a couple. And my feeling is that you could make it work with less people. And why wouldn’t you?

Joel Knights
Guest
June 16th, 2017
Reply to  Jason Berardi

Don’t forget about the 700 extras that would have worked for the majority of the shoot

Jason Berardi
Guest
June 16th, 2017
Reply to  Jason Berardi

Óskar Arnarson if they could do it with less people, I’m sure they would. The same can be said on low budget indies. Sure, you can do it with a few people, but if you don’t have to…why limit yourself?

Joelle Mcneil
Guest
June 15th, 2017

Sam Allyn I’m sure there was grilled cheese galore.

Wabwire R Deo
Guest
June 15th, 2017

With that amount, I would buy all my dream gear ?

Sjoerd van den Bersselaar
Guest
June 15th, 2017

Sabrina ?

Sabrina Parissis
Guest
June 16th, 2017

Liever 2mil voor eten dan voor geschrapte scènes xD

James Bridges
Guest
June 15th, 2017

Ok…the crew works hard, non-story…

 Roman Lehmann
Member
June 17th, 2017
Reply to  James Bridges

James, 100% agree with you

1
1
- 2
Filter:
all
Sort by:
latest

Take part in the CineD community experience