Samyang 135mm f/2.0 Lens Announced

January 14th, 2015 Jump to Comment Section 1
Samyang 135mm f/2.0 Lens Announced

Samyang 135mmSamyang has broadened its line up with release of a new lens. The Samyang 135mm f/2.0 is manual focus only and currently stands as the longest available none reflex mirror by the many-name brand.

The full name of the lens is the Samyang 135mm f/2.0 ED UMC, ED stating use of a low dispersion lens and UMC an acronym of Ultra Multi Coating, which is applied to some of the 11 lenses in 7 groups construction.

Samyang 135mm 2The Samyang 135mm has a typical specification for a fixed focal length prime, with perhaps a few upgrades when comparing to the Canon 135mm f/2.0 L.

The aperture diaphragm is constructed of 9 rounded blades versus Canons 8, it has a larger 77mm front diameter, but 90g heavier at 830g.

Samyang 135mm 3The most notable difference between the Samyang 135mm and Canon counterpart is perhaps the minimum focus distance, at 0.8m and 0.91 respectively.

Samyang lenses are known to be affordable, and the 135mm f/2.0 is no exception, at $549 it currently sits nearly half the price of the Canon 135mm f/2.0 L.

This is largely down to auto focus; as with all Samyang lenses the 135mm f/2.0 is manual focus Samyang 135mm 4only.

The lens will be available in a whole host of mounts, Canon EF, Nikon AE, Pentax K, Sony A & E, Samsung NX, Fuji X, Micro 4/3s and even Canon M.

If, like all standard Samyang lenses, expect the aperture ring to be clicked with a likely future cine version with de-clicked aperture and permanently geared focus ring. I’d also expect this lens to pop under other many-brand banners, including Rokinon and Bower.

A 135mm prime can often become overlooked, it’s not one you’d find in the average filmmaker/photographers kit bag. This is mainly down to the fact that the popular 70-200 covers this focal range, and the staple macro lens competes closely with a 100mm fixed focal length.

The 135mm prime has its uses however, it offers an extra stop at f/2.0 compared to f/2.8 that you’d find on a 70-200mm zoom or 100mm macro; that makes a huge difference. That’s not to mention the amount of light you lose through a zoom or macro; a t-stop rating of these versus a 135mm would surprise many I’m sure.

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