First Look at Final Cut Pro 10.4 and iMac Pro

October 30th, 2017
First Look at Final Cut Pro 10.4 and iMac Pro

Final Cut Pro 10.4 and the upcoming iMac Pro were demoed at the third annual FCPX Creative Summit last week, showing Apple’s continuing trend of relaxing secrecy around its professional hardware and software roadmap.

When Apple has previously shown pre-release software to invited guests, it was always behind closed doors and subject to participants signing NDAs. Apple publicly pre-announced the iMac Pro earlier this year, with a vow to open up a bit more when it came to its professional offerings, and this very public display of an un-released version of Final Cut Pro 10.4 is a welcome validation of this new strategy.

Final Cut Pro X users may well be familiar with proponents Alex Gollner, Chris Fenwick, Richard Taylor and Peter Wiggins, amongst others. It was these people who took to Twitter to share the news about Final Cut Pro 10.4 and the features coming later this year.

Final Cut Pro 10.4

New features in Final Cut Pro 10.4 are said to include:

  • HEVC (H.265) Support
  • VR tools
  • HDR (PQ and HLG) support and tools
  • Colour wheels
  • Colour curves
  • Expanded LUT support
  • New white balance tools
  • Timeline clip selection commands that jump to specific roles
  • Updated audio plugins to better complement Logic Pro X

Final Cut Pro 10.4

I know a lot of people couldn’t tolerate the colour board in FCP X. I can understand why Apple came up with the colour board, as it made better use of the limited space in the Inspector, providing four controls on one board, rather than four separate wheels. It also meant people who didn’t know about complimentary colours neutralising each other could still easily remove colour casts. But there is no doubt that more control was necessary and several popular third-party colour grading plugins came to exist because of this.

As a professional colourist, these new colour tools are hardly going to make me stop using DaVinci Resolve, but there are plenty of times when smaller jobs come through our production company that don’t have any budget allocated for colour grading but do need a basic primary balance. With the new Hue vs Hue and Hue vs Sat controls, we will now be able to perform proper balances using X-Rite Colorchecker Video charts inside Final Cut Pro X, which will save us time.

iMac Pro

The other big news here is that these Final Cut Pro 10.4 demos were performed on the new iMac Pro due for release before Christmas. According to those present, Apple demoed 8K ProRes 4444 and Raw 4K R3D media playing back in real time, un-rendered. There is a lot of excitement about the capabilities of this new iMac, so these reports will no doubt stoke the fires of anticipation even further.

Are you planning on purchasing the iMac Pro when it is launched? Will you be installing Final Cut Pro 10.4 on it when you do? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

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Tom Bouyer
Guest
November 1st, 2017

Louis Laforet

Louis Laforet
Guest
November 1st, 2017
Reply to  Tom Bouyer

C’est bon ça pour la colo inclue dans Final ! Et l’iMac Pro… Belle bête, mais ça va être trop cher pour moi ?

Tom Bouyer
Guest
November 1st, 2017
Reply to  Tom Bouyer

Louis Laforet c’était surtout pour FCP ? Les outils de colo vont faire plaisir ! Je suis content d’avoir payé Color finale tient… ^^

 Vasili Pasioudis
Member
October 31st, 2017

Disappointed! I was hoping for the following new features which are more important than new color tools which are already covered by many 3rd party developers.

1. Fix the unacceptable nature of various key-framing quirks. Key-framing needs a complete overhaul.
2. FPC/Motion round-tripping or better still, FCP/AE round-tripping but that wont happen any time soon, the 3rd party options out there are not always a solution, they are work-arounds.
3. FCP desperately requires a project/media trimmer, Worx4 is not a proper solution. I am amazed this still does not exist in fpcx

If it wasn’t because of the magnetic timeline and the unique metadata driven browser / filmstrip view & keyword range select options, I would have jumped ship but these strong features are enough to keep with fcpx.

Adam Simmons
Guest
October 31st, 2017

What’s “Final Cut?” Id rather use Sony Vegas.

Marvin Mil
Guest
October 31st, 2017
Reply to  Adam Simmons

LOL

Vishal Balsara
Guest
October 30th, 2017

Nishant Tahilramani

Nishant Tahilramani
Guest
October 31st, 2017
Reply to  Vishal Balsara

Give us back FCP 7! We don’t want your magnetic timelines. Getting excited by colour wheels. They made it literally over a decade ago.

Wilco van den Akker
Guest
October 30th, 2017

VR options?

 Bernard Shaw
Bernard Shaw
Member
October 30th, 2017

I was mentored to become an editor, meaning we use all and any tools that help us to provide the best product for our clients.

I was also taught to not veiw NLPs as a religious choice, ie. “I am a Adobe person, a FCPX person etc.

From this perspective I welcome each and every system that assists us to make things posible and easier. Premiere’s new tool for combining music underlay is wonderul for example. And so I welcome FCPX now makeing things even better.

One of the strengths of FCPX for some projects is its ability to be rock solid to render things efficiently and to offer an economical workflow. I use all the NLP depending on the project.

This is only good news as is the new iMac Pro which looks to be very integrated with the type of power and capabiities we may need,
Bravo Apple for llstening

James Manson
James Manson
Member
October 30th, 2017
Reply to  Bernard Shaw

A wonderful post by an obvious professional! Recently edited two episodes of a television show, first on Premiere then on FCPX. Style and colour – they both look the same – nobody could ever tell the difference. The only difference is that the edit in FCPX took half the time and rendered like butter. FCPX is hilariously underrated by the masses, especially for editing 4K. Stop being sheep people!

Adelson Barreto
Guest
October 30th, 2017

Makistony Carvalho

Marcus Andrew Ruiz
Guest
October 30th, 2017

Definitely looking forward to Final Cut’s update. Better late than never. :)

Rich O'Dell
Guest
October 30th, 2017

Too much too soon

Alexandre Silva
Guest
October 30th, 2017

Melhor que première ?

Finn Jäger
Guest
October 30th, 2017

too little too late.

 Jason Pischke
Member
October 30th, 2017

Lumetri was introduced in 2015… and I’m not trying to bash FCPX, but it does seem like all of the added features have been in the Adobe ecosystem for quite some time (VR, H.265, HDR Support)

 Charles Coleman
Member
October 30th, 2017
Reply to  Jason Pischke

Check afew Adobes last big updates and they’re many things FCPx had 6-7 years ago. Proxy workflow, their new mogrt workflow with AE and Premiere just to name a couple.

 Jamie Coats
Jamie Coats
Member
October 31st, 2017
Reply to  Jason Pischke

I am no professional, in fact I am an amateur and completely a hobbyist but i have used both Premier CC and FCPX and I have to say when it comes to the 80/20 rule FCPX kicks Premier’s backside, truly.

May I ask have you used both past the initial learning curve? I’m sure that if you have, meant warmly, you will see why I make the 80/20 remark.

 Jason Pischke
Member
October 31st, 2017
Reply to  Jamie Coats

I have used FCPX on a couple occasion, first after launch and more recently about a year ago and for me personally, I found that the couple minutes saved in render times where offset by my inability to fluidly transition between creating animations, audio mixing, editing, and color correction.

FCPX is often defended by “it renders faster”, and while I do agree that is true, that is only one small part of a much larger puzzle. There are way too many factors to say one is better than the other.

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