Bowens Limelite OmniRig – the ‘MoVi’ for the rest of us?

Bowens Limelite OmniRig - the 'MoVi' for the rest of us?

One of this year’s trends at NAB 2013 was clearly camera stabilization. The most prominent example for that trend was clearly the MoVi, a gyro-stabilized handheld system (we featured it here) made prominent by Vincent Laforet through his demo film. However, at §15,000, it is not exactly affordable for indie filmmakers.

OmniRig

In comes the Bowens Limelite Omnirig, a very similarly-shaped rig that is also held with two hands. Bowens is a UK company mainly known for lighting solutions, and they demoed the Omnirig through its commercial subdivision Limelite at NAB 2013, looking for feedback from professional filmmakers on how (and if) to proceed with production.

I tried it on the last day of NAB and I was very impressed. It does not have a gyro like the MoVi, it’s a purely mechanical solution – but that also makes it a lot cheaper. I was told the final price hasn’t been decided on yet, however it should be “below 2,000” – $ or £, I missed to ask, but in any case MUCH cheaper than the MoVi.

It worked surprisingly well when I tried it for a few minutes, but there is no doubt that more practice is needed than with the MoVi, which I think will deliver good results much quicker.

Considering the massive price difference, this is a sacrifice that a lot of people are going to be very happy to make.

Check out the impressive demo video of the Omnirig. Beware there seems to be post-stabilization going on in the video, it looks a lot like they used warp stabilizer. Would be nice to see the video without the stabilization applied.

Bowens plan on making it available this summer.

We will of course do our best to get our hands on an Omnirig to be used in one of our real-world reviews.

Single Shot Cinema: Camera flying through the window from 4Film on Vimeo.

via Bowens (at NAB 2013) and ePHOTOzine

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Jazz
Jazz
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July 13th, 2013

saw this video side by side in slow motion sccene not match

drawer77
Guest
April 20th, 2013

How can you make the difference between a shot done with a stabilizing mount system and the same shot stabilized during post-producation ?

Limelite Video
Guest
April 17th, 2013

Hey Everyone, For exclusive updates about the OmniRig sign up to our newsletter here:
http://www.limelite.uk.com/omnirig

marktierneyfilm
Guest
April 14th, 2013

I think you’re all being very harsh. I thought the video was very good for an under $2k product.
Of course the video has to be that wide – where would you put the FF on that rig, and the remote transmitter?
Would you ever use it for a shot that long? No. But compared to the cheap Glidecams that a lot of people use now it has a different set of uses because of its more rectangular shape.
As to the warp – they mainly use it on the changeovers. Big whoop.
Would I buy one? No. But I only tend to rent stabilisers when I need them, and that’s rare.

Leonard Retel Helmrich
Leonard Retel Helmrich
Guest
April 18th, 2013

Stabilization is in the OmniRig self. Please see the link https://vimeo.com/64080527 where you can see that there is almost no difference between the stabilized and the un-warp-stabilized version of the same shot.

Bryant Swanstrom
Bryant Swanstrom
Guest
April 29th, 2013

I stopped watching the stabilized version when I saw the first artifact(from post stabilization) immediately after the camera started moving.

It’s a cool rig if your going for a handheld look. Don’t try and compare this to a real stabilizing system.

Maarten Toner
Member
April 14th, 2013

This reminds me of Mike Figgis’s Fig Rig he designed for Manfrotto, the real problem with moves like this is speed, how much control and stabilisation do you get when going really slow.
From all the stabilisation in the video I guess the answer is: not as much as you want :) Because shots like that we used to do with big beta’s and let inertia be our friend.

Jori
Jori
Guest
April 14th, 2013

You need a lens as wide as that and the result is still as shaky and wobbly?

Yeah, “below 2k” whether it’s bucks or quid seems too much for this, for me at least.

On the other hand, I guess they were really pushing it to the limit and probably with not that much time for practice.

Anyways, judging by the video, not overly impressing.

Martin
Martin
Guest
April 14th, 2013

Whats the point of doing a stabilizer demo using additional stabilization?!

John Kilderry
Member
April 14th, 2013

Yes, the warp stabilization was apparent making the continuous shot unusable by my estimation. Still, I think this holds promise with additional engineering.

Sean
Guest
April 14th, 2013

Looks like pretty heavy use of post stabilisation in the demo video.. Would be nice to see what it looks without that..

Myles
Myles
Guest
April 14th, 2013
Reply to  Sean

Good point. Some people might watch this and immediately assume it’s all down to the rig, which is quite misleading.

chris
chris
Guest
April 15th, 2013
Reply to  Sean

https://vimeo.com/64080527

This is the un-stabilized footage of the same shot.

Leonard Retel Helmrich
Leonard Retel Helmrich
Guest
June 20th, 2013
Reply to  Sean

Please look at the raw footage of this scene at https://vimeo.com/64080527
and see for your self that the post stabilization was minor.

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