Canon EOS-1D X Mark III Announced: 5.5K RAW Video Internally

January 7th, 2020
Canon EOS-1D X Mark III Announced: 5.5K RAW Video Internally

During CES 2020 in Las Vegas, Canon has just introduced its new flagship Full Frame DSLR: the Canon EOS-1D X Mark III. This beast features a brand new 20.1MP CMOS sensor and is capable of shooting videos up to 4K 60p in 10-bit 4:2:2 Canon Log and 5.5K RAW video, all of that without the need for an external recorder. Let’s take a closer look at it!

Canon EOS-1D X Legacy

Right in time before the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo this summer, Canon unleashed their new Full-Frame beast: the Canon EOS-1D X Mark III. The EOS-1D series of cameras has always been the top-of-the-line DSLR from Canon since the introduction of the first EOS-1D X in 2011. In 2016, Canon launched the EOS-1D X Mark II, which is still, even today, an incredible workhorse for both stills and video shooters.

Canon EOS-1D X cameras are not for everyone: they are large, heavy, made to take some abuse, and expensive. But one thing is sure; you get what you pay for. The cameras are tropicalized, the body is made from magnesium alloy, and they feature incredible photo and video capabilities. Canon’s DSLRs have significantly fallen behind in video capabilities over the last few years, but this seems to change, finally… But let’s take it step by step.

Canon1DXMarkIII_Featured

Image credit: Canon

Canon EOS-1D X Mark III Photo Features

The Canon EOS-1D X Mark III boasts a new Full-Frame 20.1MP CMOS sensor. Also, with a new DIGIX X processor and sensor low pass filter, the camera is capable of shooting from 100 up to 102,400 ISO (extends up to 819,200) while producing cleaner and less noisy images.

More processing power also means that the camera can shoot up to 16 frames per second when you are looking through the viewfinder or 20fps in LiveView mode. In burst mode, the AF/AE focus tracking will ensure that all your shots are in sharp focus. The RAW+JPEG buffer is rated as 1000+.

You can shoot pictures in JPEG, RAW, or HEIF format. This new HEIF format is similar to what an iPhone can shoot, and it’s a file format that can store twice as much information as a JPEG file.

Canon1DXMarkIII_07

Image credit: Canon

Canon EOS-1D X Mark III Video Features

On the video side, the Canon EOS-1D X Mark III is an incredible DSLR. First thing first, it is the first EOS-1D X camera that can finally record in Canon Log, a long-awaited missing feature of its predecessor. Here is a quick list of the various recording modes that are available internally:

  • 1080P videos up to 120 frames per second.
  • 4K DCI up to 60fps in 4:2:2 10-bit in Canon Log using an H.265 / HEVC codec. Please note that when you turn off Canon Log, you can only shoot in 4:2:0 8-bit in H.264.
  • 5.5K (5,472 x 2,286) up to 60fps in RAW 12-bit. The maximum bitrate is 2600 Mbps.

There is no crop in 5.5K RAW shooting mode, but there is a slight crop in 4K DCI mode. Indeed, the camera uses the entire 5.5K sensor width and downsample it to 4K DCI size, so expect a tiny crop of about 256 pixels on each side. Otherwise, a crop mode is available in 4 DCI is you want to punch in your shots.

The Canon EOS-1D X Mark III’s sensor is not stabilized, but Canon has included Movie Digital IS to compensate a bit. Also, peaking, and a focus guide are available in video modes.

Canon1DXMarkIII_05

Image credit: Canon

All your footage are stored onto two CFexpress cards for redundancy purposes.

Canon1DXMarkIII_06

Image credit: Canon

On the connectivity side, there is a 3.5mm microphone jack input and a 3.5mm headphone jack output. Also, there is a mini-HDMI output, but it is limited to 4K-only. There is a USB Type-C port, but there is no mention if you can charge the camera through it.

New AF Sensor

The Canon EOS-1D X Mark III features a new AF sensor, which is way more massive than the Mark II’s one. Indeed, this new AF sensor covers 90% of the sensor for a total of 525 AF areas.

There is no doubt Canon implemented some technology from the Canon EOS-R’s incredible AF capabilities. Indeed, according to Canon, they are using “advanced AF algorithms with deep learning technology for unparalleled focus tracking in any situation.”

For video shooters, the Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology – which is one of the best AF systems available on the market – is still there. However, keep in mind that Dual Pixel CMOS AF doesn’t work in 4K 50P/60P uncropped modes and 5.5K RAW 60P video shooting modes.

Canon1DXMarkIII_08

Image credit: Canon

Connectivity, Display, and Ergonomics

I said it before, but keep in mind that the 1D X Mark III is a heavy camera despite its magnesium alloy body at 2.2lbs/1.4Kg with a battery and card, but without a lens. It measures 158.0 x 167.6 x 82.6 mm.

On the back of the camera, there is a 3.02″/8.01cm touchscreen display as well as a two status display: one under the main screen and one at the top of the camera. The Canon EOS-1D X Mark III is powered via a big Canon LP-E19 battery. According to Canon, the battery life should be around 4 hours and 40 minutes at 23°C or 4 hours and 10 minutes at 0°C.

Canon1DXMarkIII_04

Image credit: Canon

Like every modern camera, the Canon EOS-1D X Mark III is Bluetooth compatible if you want to transfer some pictures to your phone quickly. To track your photographs, there is a built-in GPS. But, as a high-end camera, it also features a full-size Ethernet port as well as a built-in WiFi module. For extended range and faster wireless transfers, you’ll have to purchase the optional WFT-E9 wireless transmitter.

Finally, on the ergonomics side, all of the buttons on the back of the camera can be illuminated, which is extremely handy in dim conditions. To effectively manage this incredible AF sensor, there is a new AF point selection control within the AF-ON button in addition to the multi-controller.

Canon1DXMarkIII_03

Image credit: Canon

Pricing and Availability

The Canon EOS-1D X Mark III will be available in February for $6500.

What do you think of the Canon EOS-1D X Mark III? Is it the camera you’ve been waiting for? Let us know in the comments below!

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 Kiki Vasilescu
Kiki Vasilescu
Member
January 14th, 2020

Cinema5d just published something about expensive Sony gear. No one agonizes about that. No one saying that cinema5d is for enthusiasts’ gear. I just wonder why only Red cameras bring the negative comments?!

Shoebox 9
Shoebox 9
Member
January 9th, 2020

Hi Jeff, you missed one of the most critcal things about this camera for hybrid shooters. DPAF is disabled for FF 4k 60p & Raw.

But, you can use 4k 60p with DPAF in a 1.3x crop mode (same as the Mark II) but never for raw, with is only manual focus, thanks to the Canon cripple hammer.

Ronnie Chan
Guest
January 9th, 2020
Reply to  Shoebox 9

There was no mentioned with the crop factor 1.3x or 1.6x.If it is 1.3x,I thinks most of us pretty happy with it.I belief those whom shoot raw is pretty much non run and gun user which have the entire crew supporting the production.Manual pull focus makes much sense.

Jamie
Jamie
Guest
January 8th, 2020

I certainly don’t speak for everyone- Nor claim to, but for me, I’ve fallen onto the trap of new technologies that have inspired me to be undoubtedly attracted to
new camera systems throughout the years. From the 5d, 7d, 5d3, Fs700, C300, Red Epic Dragon, FS7, C200 etc. And I’ve done great work on all those systems. I’ve also learned that non of those cameras dictated my end product. If you started with a 5d, or camcorder, everything is an upgrade. We’re spoiled. Suck it up. Maximize what you have, I can assure you- it’s good enough. Know your cameras limitations, and know it through and through. Glass, talent, lighting and art direction is far more important than camera systems. Debates on what’s best will go on forever, but who’s making money and bridging the gap between doing what they love and creating? Maybe the person who’s using their iPhone. Because audiences look for quality content. Not camera systems. Don’t be fooled. Maximize the potential of what you have on hand.

StrictlyanAmateur
StrictlyanAmateur
Guest
January 8th, 2020

This comment is wrong: “Also, it doesn’t feature a built-in WiFi module”…

StrictlyanAmateur
StrictlyanAmateur
Guest
January 8th, 2020

This is wrong…… “Also, it doesn’t feature a built-in WiFi module”

Jem Schofield
Guest
January 7th, 2020

I do wish that they had standardized on Cinema Raw Light though.

Gregory R Greenhaw
Gregory R Greenhaw
Guest
January 7th, 2020

Wonder if it can record via the usb to a t5 ssd?

 Markus Magnon
Markus Magnon
Member
January 7th, 2020

2600 Megabit/Second are 325 Megabyte/Second.
Very impressive. Wondering about the cooling system. No fan?
I hope they will integrate “raw light”. Or is it allready “raw light”?

 Sam Emilio
Sam Emilio
Member
January 9th, 2020
Reply to  Markus Magnon

What’s interesting is what Canon’s white paper says on the topic. They don’t seem to have EXPLICITLY defined all the details yet, but they did confirm the CRM container. What’s most telling is this line between pages 18-19 when talking about mixed camera workflows:

“there are small differences between Cinema RAW Light of the EOS C200 or EOS C500 Mark II, and the RAW video of the EOS-1D X Mark III”

It further distinguishes Cinema Raw/Cinema RAW Light in Figure 13. SO excited to see what comes out of this thing.

Admin
January 7th, 2020

Everything the Canon 1D C should have been and never was…

 Dan Hyman
Dan Hyman
Member
January 7th, 2020
Reply to  Johnnie Behiri

Let’s be fair Johnny, that was 2012. At least what the 1D C II should have been and never was..

Admin
January 8th, 2020
Reply to  Dan Hyman

Hi Dan. If you owned the 1D C, or used it, you know exactly what I mean. Unfortunately Canon neglected it completely. So it is not about the camera name per se or RAW features, it is more about some basic functionality that was missing from a camera that was declared as part of their cinema line.

Thank you
Johnnie

Szymek
Guest
January 7th, 2020

@add_mean :O

zorppp
Guest
January 7th, 2020

Well done, Canon. Have to give it to them, they went out and did it. This camera looks like an absolute beast. The single best hybrid camera you can get. DPAF, insane buffer, RAW video with 14 stops of dynamic range, and great battery life.

Miklos Nemeth
Miklos Nemeth
Guest
January 8th, 2020
Reply to  zorppp

Definitely it not the single best hybrid, no way, this is a DSLR, a dead-end dinosaur to extinct. It has not even tilting screen, it has no IBIS, it has no EVF at all, it is too big and heavy, and it is crazy expensive. Honestly, for hybrid photojournalism I’d pick a camera like Z6, A7iii, A9.

 Alec Kinnear
Alec Kinnear
Member
January 15th, 2020
Reply to  Miklos Nemeth

Miklos, those are very good points. Without either an EVF or tilting screen I don’t know how a cameraman would shoot video on the 1DX III. Looks like external monitor required.

Like you, I prefer my Z6 light package: built-in EVF and tilting screen with tiny RODE VideoMicro. Video autofocus on the Z6 is very impressive (any focus issues you hear about are really confined to AF-C in stills).

 Kiki Vasilescu
Kiki Vasilescu
Member
January 7th, 2020

At this price why not stick with a used Red camera? The tech details, color science, dynamic range, usability on set, post workflow… all are years ahead of all DSLR or Mirrorless cameras. All the hype for the new products only drains money from our pockets instead using those money on actors, sets, wardrobe, lights… I wouldn’t ever use a Sony Canon Nikon BlackMagic ever again. All these are just toys for wanna bees that toy alone while dreaming for moviemaking. Not even a short cannot be done by itself, so don’t go for the small size or ease of use: that will not matter. What matters is the image final quality, and that usually means lights and sets and acting and focus puller and an entire crew. If I’d knew that when I bought my first damned DSLR I would have saved not only thousands of $ (lost while selling my gear in the upgrade process) but also years of getting only sub-par final images. And life is invaluable… it goes away and never returns. If you shoot something, make sure it’s best possible image, otherwise it’s just a child’s game that leads no where. Really

Member
January 7th, 2020
Reply to  Kiki Vasilescu

What a nonsense, why not stick with a used red camera? It’s not full frame, and this thing shoots stills. There are enough hybrid shooters that use both. Also a Red camera is not going to make your images better, no offense dude, but I checked your portfolio and I would focus less on camera and more on composition, use of light, etc. I’ll stick with my toys, have a good day.

 Kiki Vasilescu
Kiki Vasilescu
Member
January 7th, 2020
Reply to  Gerbert Floor

I’m sorry you’ve felt in the targeted lego boys gang. But as you attack me personaly when you run out of arguments… I’d say you really should first look in the mirror. I’m just wondering what portfolio are you talking about, as I have none posted on my facebook account. Your answer comes from the brain-washed marketing mantra about the magic full-frame wich is, by the way, just a photo cliche while 99% movies are super35 (film or digital). But I’m happy that you agree wih my point: it’s not about getting new gear, like this new Canon, but rather story and light and acting. Your toys and friends asked to play as actors will do that, of course.

 Dan Hyman
Dan Hyman
Member
January 7th, 2020
Reply to  Kiki Vasilescu

Maybe it’s the wrong website, since this is CINEMA 5D, but I come here to check out the latest gear for what I do. We do TV commercials, corporate videos, interviews, mini-docs. Yes, we love our REDs, but Canon also brings a lot to the table. We have jobs that specifically call for accurate auto-focus and out of the box REC709 style coloring without a lot post for fast turnarounds. Better color and full frame will play very nicely with our line of L’s. For higher end work, of course, use a RED and a nice cine lens. But you’re right, at the end of the day, it comes down to composition, lighting and telling the right story. These cameras are tools and I personally think the 1DX III, along with the C500 II will be a hit for corporate, event, run and gun doc, etc.

 Kiki Vasilescu
Kiki Vasilescu
Member
January 7th, 2020
Reply to  Dan Hyman

You’re right. But what I wanted to say, from my own saga, is that going this way I lost so much money and time. Going from Canon to Sony and then to Red costed my around 10k.

Rostislav Alexandrov
Rostislav Alexandrov
Guest
January 8th, 2020
Reply to  Gerbert Floor

I’m sorry to say Gerbert, but “it’s not full frame” absolutely makes no difference at all to the picture. The full frame standard came from photography. It became commercial and brainwashed everyone that full frame is the best. It isn’t. S35 was always the standard in video and film and the bigger the sensor , the worse rolling shutter. It’s all about the image processing and their algorithms nowadays.

Kevin C Spence
Kevin C Spence
Guest
January 7th, 2020
Reply to  Kiki Vasilescu

Key Phrase in this article is “Canon EOS-1D X cameras are not for everyone”

Akpe Ogirigbo
Akpe Ogirigbo
Member
January 7th, 2020
Reply to  Kiki Vasilescu

These days people with NO brain just come online and chat pure RUBBISH.
1) Every film i shot on VARIOUS CAMERA went to cinema.
2) Two of the films screened at TIFF (one shot entirely on 5D3 Magic Lantern and second film on Arri Alexa)
3) 5 Films on Netflix all shot on (Arri, Red, Blackmagic and 5D3 MagicLantern)
I guess this “wanna bee dreamer” did well with those toys.
Why don’t you show us your portfolio MR PRO with the EXPENSIVE gear.

 Kiki Vasilescu
Kiki Vasilescu
Member
January 7th, 2020
Reply to  Akpe Ogirigbo

Oh boy. RED is not expensive, especially second hand. Arri is expensive. But how much money got your 5 filmes that you still care about this discussion?!

Akpe Ogirigbo
Akpe Ogirigbo
Member
January 7th, 2020
Reply to  Kiki Vasilescu

Still waiting for you to link us to the films you have shot on you RED CAMERA dude

Ronnie Chan
Guest
January 9th, 2020
Reply to  Akpe Ogirigbo

Well said

Ashley
Ashley
Guest
January 7th, 2020
Reply to  Kiki Vasilescu

Dummy, it’s a stills camera with video options.

 Kiki Vasilescu
Kiki Vasilescu
Member
January 7th, 2020
Reply to  Ashley

Exactly.

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