Canon EOS C70 Announced – Bridging Cinema and Mirrorless Lines

September 24th, 2020

Canon has just announced the launch of its first RF mount cinema camera: the Canon EOS C70. This lightweight and compact camera feature a Super35 sensor with Dual Gain Output capabilities. The EOS C70 can shoot at up to 4K at 120 frames per second in 4:2:2 10-bit directly onto SD cards. Johnnie my colleague took the opportunity to talk to Aron Randhawa from Canon Europe in order to explore a bit more what this camera really brings to the table. Let’s take a closer look at it!

The new Canon EOS C70 is the first Canon cinema camera with a built-in RF Mount (more on that later). Similar to the recent EOS C300 Mark III (you can watch our review here), the EOS C70 features a Super35 sensor with Dual Gain Output (DGO) capabilities. This DGO technology combines two amplifications of a moving image into one and allows you to shoot at high-ISO with reduced noise.

However, its a brand new sensor and not the same sensor as the C300 Mark III. The sensor is the same as the one found inside the Canon C300 MarK III and according to Canon, the EOS C70 is capable of recording up to 16 stops of dynamic range. The dynamic range results in our Lab Test with the EOS C300 Mark III were excellent, and we’ll make sure to run our lab test once the camera get its final firmware.

A suitable sensor is nothing without a great image processor behind it. Canon didn’t take any shortcuts, and the Canon EOS C70 features a powerful DIGIC DV 7 processor. This image processor is the same as the one you can find in the EOS C300 Mark III /C500 Mark II. The least we can say is that this sensor/processor combo unlocks a ton of recording modes

Rear loook
Canon EOS C70 – Image credit: Canon

Recording Modes

The Canon EOS C70 is capable of recording in either XF-AVC (H.264) or MP4 internally. Unfortunately, you can’t record in any flavor of Canon Cinema RAW/Cinema RAW Light internally. At the moment, there’s little information about external recording capabilities, although a clean signal can be outputted via the large HDMI connector found in the camera

The Canon EOS C70 can record internally in DCI 4K/4K UHD at up to 60p in XF-AVC H.264 Long GOP 4:2:2-10bit at a bitrate of 260Mbps (DCI 4K), and up to 410 Mbps in 4K/DCI in up to 30p. If you choose to use the MP4 H.265 Long GOP codec, you can shoot in DCI 4K/4K UHD at up to 60p in 4:2:2 10- bit with a 225Mbps bitrate.

For slow-motion lovers, in XF-AVC HFR H.264 Long GOP/MP4 HFR H2.265 Long GOP, you can even go at up to 120 frames per second in 4:2:2 10-bit. In this slow-motion recording mode, you’ll still get access to Dual Pixel CMOS AF and audio recording.

Finally, if you drop your resolution to 2K/1080P, you can even crank up your framerates to 180fps, still in 4:2:2 10-bit with audio recording, but of course with some image crop.

Two SD cards sloots
Canon EOS C70 Dual SD Cards Slots. Image credit: CineD

The Dual SD card slots support high-speed UHS-II V90 cards. The EOS C70 offers you simultaneous recording options configurations such as double slot, relay, and simultaneous recording.

Also, for the first time on a Canon Cinema Camera, you can now simultaneously record different formats, resolutions, and bit depths on each media card slot!

Autofocus and ND Filters

The Canon EOS C70 comes with Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology. The Dual Gain Output and Dual Pixel CMOS AF system work together to achieve precise and reliable autofocus capabilities.

At the back of the EOS C70, there’s a 3.5 Inch flip-out touchscreen display (more on that later), and the Dual Pixel CMOS AF covers approximately 80% of the display’s horizontal/vertical range.

The Canon EOS C70 is the first Canon Cinema Camera that features EOS iTR – Intelligent Tracking and Recognition – AF X technology. This AF technology was first introduced with the EOS R5 and includes a special head/face detection algorithm that recognizes your subject’s head even if the person turns to the side/back.

Tracking AF is also available on the EOS C70, which allows you to stay focused on a subject that you can select via the touch screen or joystick.

It looks like the Canon EOS C70 autofocus capabilities will probably be rock solid, as Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology is currently one of the best in the industry and continually improving.

Stabilization

Like the Canon EOS C500 Mark II, the Canon EOS C70’s sensor isn’t mechanically stabilized (no IBIS). However, it features 5-axis Electronic Image Stabilization that works with every Canon IS lens. For best possible results, you’ll have to use Canon RF lenses as you’ll be unlocking “Combination IS.” The lens and camera body will communicate image stabilization information between each other and coordinate their stabilization results. Of course, as always with Electronic Image Stabilization, there will be a slight image crop.

Vs Canon 1D C
Canon EOS C70 at the front, and 1D C at the back. Image credit: CineD

Ergonomics

As I already mentioned, the Canon EOS C70 is a lightweight and compact camera. It is smaller and less deep than a Canon EOS-1DX Mark III/C200. In terms of size, the EOS C70 is 6.3in/160mm large, 5.1in/130.2mm high, and 4.6in/115.9mm deep.

As you can see, the camera doesn’t have a built-in EVF, but there is a flip-out touchscreen display. You can use the touchscreen to adjust your AF points, but also to start/stop recording, access the menu, change your recording settings, and so on, thanks to a new user interface. This new user interface looks straightforward and easy to use, perfect for single shooters.

There are 13 buttons all around the camera that allows you to get direct access to the most frequently used functions. If you’re not familiar with Canon Cinema Cameras, most of these buttons are user-customizable.

The EOS C70 is also the first Canon Cinema Camera that features a built-in, non-removable handgrip. As a C200 shooter, I have to admit that mounting the handle every time is annoying, and I like that new multi-functional integrated grip. This design change makes the EOS C70 looks more like a DSLR/Mirrorless camera with impressive filmmaking capabilities.

Back to the handgrip itself, it now features a front dial, rear dial, a select dial plus set button, and a new eight-direction joystick (previous joysticks only had four directions). All the controls are at your fingertips. It is nice to adjust/have access to all your essential parameters once you develop muscle memory without even looking at the buttons. I found that it tremendously improves my working speed in fast-shooting environments as a one-man-band filmmaker.

moounting pooints
Canon EOS C70 side mounting point. Image credit: Canon

Mounting Points

To mount the Canon EOS C70, there are one 1/4″-20 & one 3/8″-16 mounting points at the bottom. There is one cold-shoe mount at the top of the camera. You can use it to attach accessories or the included handle with a mic holder.
Finally, there is one 1/4″-20 point on the left side of the camera to mount it on vertical mode. It is quite unusual, but with the growth of vertical content for social media, it can be useful. Please note that you can turn the UI display on the built-in screen inside the menu for more convenience.

camera  connectivity
Canon EOS C70 Dual mini XLR and Time Code connectors. Image credit: Canon

Inputs / Outputs

Most of the Canon EOS C70 input/output ports are on the left side, while the SD card slots are on the right side, and a TimeCode in/out terminal is placed in the lower front of the body. In terms of connectivity, you’ll find:

  • Two three-pin mini XLR input ports with 48V phantom power. Audio control dials are behind the flip-out touchscreen display.
  • One 3.5mm mini-jack input.
  • One 3.5mm headphone jack.
  • A USB Type-C connector to connect an optional wired/wireless Ethernet/WiFi adapter.
  • A remote terminal.
  • An HDMI (Type-A) port
  • In front of the camera, there are also two built-in stereo mics for scratch audio.
  • As you can tell, there’s no SDI output port, which is one of the significant omissions for a professional cinema camera. But, there’s a timecode port in front of the camera.

ND Filters, Cooling, Power

The Canon EOS C70 does have built-in 2/4/6/8/10-stops ND filters. If you need even more filtration, you can use the Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter EF-EOS R with Variable ND.

One of the numerous debates around the recent EOS R5 was overheating issues in a couple of video recording modes. The EOS C70 shouldn’t suffer from any overheating issues thanks to an independent ventilation system. There are one air intake on the right side of the camera and two air outlets on the body’s side and bottom.

The EOS C70 is not water sealed, but the air intake/outlet are protected from dust/water with special ducts.

Finally, the EOS C70 uses Canon BP-A30/A60 batteries, the same as those for the C200/C300 Mark III/C500 Mark II. There’s a DC input port if you want to run the camera from main power.

Canon EOS C70
Canon EOS C70 together with Canon RF 24-70mm lens. Image credit: CineD

RF Mount

The Canon RF lens mount was first introduced with the Canon EOS R mirrorless camera in October 2018. Also, the latest Canon EOS R5 and Canon EOS R6 do come with an RF Mount.

A couple of high-quality native Canon RF lenses are already available on the market like the RF 70- 200 F/2.8L IS USM, the RF 85mm F/1.2L USM DS, the RF 24-70mm F/2.8, and so on. However, these lenses do come at a high price.

But, thanks to a short flange distance of only 20mm, this Canon RF Mount is very versatile and allows you to mount Canon EF lenses you might already have easily. A couple of adapters are already available from Canon:

  • The “basic” Mount Adapter EF-EOS R
  • A more advanced version Control Ring Mount Adapter EF-EOS R,
  • The Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter EF-EOS R. This adapter allows you to slot-in variable ND filters, Circular Polarizer Filter (CPL), or clear filter. Other companies, such as Breakthrough Photography (https://www.cined.com/breakthrough-photography-filters-for- canon-ef-eos-r-adapter-introduced/) are starting to make additional drop-in filters. All these adapters are compatible with the EOS C70 and maintain AF plus Image Stabilization capabilities from your EF lenses.

Focal length extenders for the RF Mount are also available, and the Extenders RF 1.4x/2x are compatible with the Canon EOS C70.

Mount Adapter
Mount Adapter EF-EOS R 0.71x. Image credit: Canon

Mount Adapter EF-EOS R 0.71x

With the launch of the Canon EOS C70, Canon also introduced a new Mount Adapter EF-EOS R 0.71x.

This adapter employs an optical conversion to capture a Full Frame field of view of an EF lens. Also, by using this adapter, you’ll gain an increased light transmission of around 1-stop. In short, you can look at this Mount Adapter EF-EOS R 0.71x as a “Speedbooster-like” adapter.

Canon EOS C70 with Mount Adapter
Mount Adapter EF-EOS R 0.71x. Image credit: Canon

Same as other Canon EF-EOS R adapters, the 0.71x version enables Dual Pixel CMOS AF, optical correction, displays, and records F-stop numbers, focal length, and lens metadata.

The Canon EOS C70 is already at our office. Stay tuned for more…

Price and Availability

The Canon EOS C70 should be available towards the end of the year for around €4500 ($5499). I find the EOS C70 to be an excellent value for money for filmmakers, with an aggressive price-tag close to the EOS R5.

What do you think about the Canon EOS C70? What do you think would be best for your needs, the EOS R5 or EOS C70? What feature is missing for you on the latest Canon Cinema Camera? Don’t hesitate to let us know in the comments below!

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Liran H
Liran H
Member
October 6th, 2020

Now it seems that Canon crippled the R5 because they were developing the C70 on the same time.
The C70 seems to be a very solid video camera that did everything right where the R5 did wrong.
However, Canon also crippled the C70 by not including besides full-frame and and IBIS as in the R5so they won’t cannibalise the C500.

2020 was supposed to be Canon’s best year in years, but instead it’s a year that made – me- frustrated with Canon.
Instead Canon listening and complying to our needs as photographers/videographers/hybrid users, we get a blown out proportions PR stunt and later we need to adjust out expectation.

Instead of selling the R5 as “Canon EOS R5’s
flagship filmmaking feature changes the game” and shouting all over the internet “8k RAW!” “120fps/4k”!!!

They should have sold it as a photo-centric camera that also has great video features, but is not video-centric as the upcoming C70.

Maybe the excitement was more moderated, but there would have much less backlash towards Canon.

I just wish, that instead of thinking about their Canon-eco-system, they would actually try to be innovative without compromising anything because it might hurt their sales.

Why don’t they get the fact that big productions will always go with the big guns C500-C700, medium production users/documentarian will go with C70-C300 and the small production companies will stick up with the DSLR.

The dslr market is shrinking from year to year and Canon’s stock is at an all-time low, what should make them wake up before they come out with the same announcement as Olympus?

https://www.olympus-global.com/ir/data/announcement/2020/contents/ir00013.pdf

Last edited 22 days ago by Liran H
Walter Vargas
Walter Vargas
Guest
October 1st, 2020

Why can I post a comment, but not give someone a thumbs-up?

Thomas
Thomas
Guest
September 28th, 2020

Does anybody know what kind of hardware requirements there are for 10 bit 4:2:2 editing?
I’m currently on a Dell XPS15 i7, using Davinci Resolve, and wondering whether I’ll be able to handle these files at all. Any thoughts?

John
John
Guest
September 30th, 2020
Reply to  Thomas

If you are editing a codec such as XAVC/H.264 it is quite compressed. It is considered an efficient codec which effectively means it highly packaged to reduce file sizes, but will need to be unpacked during editing, hence why it’ll prove demanding on your editing computer. Using a desktop would be a wiser choice in my opinion especially bang-for-your-buck wise. A computer with an Intel i9 10900K should be ideal processor-wise. Most video-editing programmes use GPU acceleration so a good GPU such as an RTX 3080 or 3090 would be ideal.

David Ells
David Ells
Member
September 28th, 2020

This article mentions that there’s no DC in but there is. It is discussed at length in ProAV’s long Q&A with Canon on Youtube. You can also see it plainly in images of the back of the camera.

microobserver
Member
September 26th, 2020

Sounds good. I do think on such an expensive camera that they should have included an EVF. On their R5 and R6, but why not continue the format here? They think too much about people with mobile phones migrating to cine cameras, but perhaps many who would want this are more filmmakers who would appreciate an EVF, e.g. for ‘run-n-gun’ and documentary work esp. working outdoor in bright sun light. Also handy at night for not drawing attention to yourself with a large backlit screen in certain situations. I was thinking about this camera but an EVF would be a must for me. Looks like the ‘Cripple Hammer’ has moved from the Mirrorless side of things to the Cine side. Ouch!

Last edited 1 month ago by microobserver
Dan Hyman
Dan Hyman
Member
September 25th, 2020

We own C500 II’s and C300 III. Use them daily, and they’re everything we had hoped for. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. I don’t know why camera companies dont just level the playing field and give us all ProRes in all of their cameras. It edits like a dream. H265, from my experience. looks great, but doesn’t edit/grade as nicely, you still have to transcode it for effortless editing. I don’t mind the omission of RAW, if we want that, we can record on another camera, but if this camera strictly had just the ProRes family, it would be perfect. Canon put ProRes in their C700, why not just focus on sensor, stabilization, color science and processor and cut the crap on the codec game?

Derek Olson
Derek Olson
Member
September 28th, 2020
Reply to  Dan Hyman

Apple charges a fee for licensing prores, so it would increase costs. If this camera cost an extra $1k, you’d be complaining about that. There’s just no way to please everybody

Dan Hyman
Dan Hyman
Member
October 7th, 2020
Reply to  Derek Olson

Not sure it would add cost. The BMPCC 4K cost $1300 and has ProRes and RAW. I dont think with just RAW it would be a $300 camera.

Collin Meyer
Collin Meyer
Member
September 25th, 2020

Hey, there’s clearly a dc in port on the back of the camera.

Matt Johnston
Matt Johnston
Member
September 25th, 2020

I just bought a 2nd c200 on the used marked low hours for $5000AUD and I feel that’s a better option than this camera.

I was honestly expecting a video focused super 35mm R5 with all flavours of raw lite and the usual NDs/XLR48v this just feels like a hotdog camera made up of random bits and pieces from the C line but doesn’t shine in any way apart from the 16+ DR claim also that RF to EF speed booster is pretty cool but that’s about it.

The only reality I could see this being an option would be a 2nd camera to either c500ii or c300iii.

I feel this camera creates more questions than it answers?

Tomas
Tomas
Guest
September 25th, 2020

Looks interesting. Can you record audio from xlr to channel 1 and 2 and from the trs to channel 3 and 4? Thanks!

Last edited 1 month ago by Tomas
Ben J
Ben J
Member
September 25th, 2020
Reply to  Tomas

Yes

Eugenia L
Member
September 25th, 2020

Overall, it’s a good camera! However, for that price, it has no SDI-out, no DPAF II or full sensor AF, no IBIS, and too low bitrate in 10bit 4:2:0 at just 100mbps at 24p (GPUs don’t support 10bit 4:2:2, so they’re super difficult to edit). They should have had a 24p 10bit 4:2:0 mode at 150 mbps to start talking.

If they had these small things fixed, I might be buying it now. No need for RAW.

Compared to my existing BMPCC 4k, the C70 has internal NDs, DPAF, bigger sensor, better battery life, articulating screen, more DR. On the other hand, the BMPCC 4k has a larger screen, and RAW, and costs 4.2 times less. With potential fixes: Viltrox speedbooster, variable ND + IR CUT, external screen, rig with V-mount, the BMPCC4k still costs 2x less.

So the only question then becomes: does AF and extra buttons worth 2x the price for you? If you’re a quick shooter that reacts to the environment, possibly. But if you’re doing narratives, where each shot is pre-calculated, maybe not.

2Namess Probsh
2Namess Probsh
Member
September 25th, 2020
Reply to  Eugenia L

Damn, you got some good points right there…

canon5dsquared
canon5dsquared
Member
September 25th, 2020
Reply to  Eugenia L

So the option is an all-in-one package or a Blackmagic that you have to kit out?

Seems a little odd to use variable ND filters you’d have to bring along with you for every shoot and situation, or just get a Canon Cxx and you’d have them built-in. Everyone knows ND’s work better at the sensor level than on the front of a lens.

Eugenia L
Member
September 25th, 2020
Reply to  canon5dsquared

Regarding the all in one and having to kit out: Well, if the price at the end for a narrative director/DP is 2x, then having to kit it out is not a problem. The problem is mostly for those who are run and gun, in which case they’d need AF anyway. So your comment does not go against my conclusions: if you are run and gun, e.g. weddings, get the C70. If you are shooting narratives, save money with the bmpcc4k.

Regarding the NDs: Variable is just faster, nothing more than that. Fixed NDs are just fine too, just more expensive overall. Remember, I was trying to get a kit at a low price to compare it to the C70. This was not a suggestion of variable vs fixed. It was a means to an end.

Robert M
Robert M
Member
October 2nd, 2020
Reply to  Eugenia L

ZCAM E2-M4 is far easier to kit out than BMPCC 4K, has better slow motion, a superior form factor, and more codecs.
BMPCC 4K is only more convenient to use after installing a flip-screen and SSD kit. It still comes out a little cheaper if we factor in Davinci Resolve Studio.

Kensh
Kensh
Guest
September 28th, 2020
Reply to  Eugenia L

Your consideration is what I had when the first c100 came out in 2012 and is priced 2.5x compared to 5Diii. After rigging out the 5D it is still cheaper than c100. However after using it for multiple projects, I say it is worth every penny and got myself 2 more sets. The amount of gears to prepare before the shoot was greatly reduced, shooting workflow is much faster and lesser chance for gears to break down on set because you need lesser gears. External variable ND filters have limitations, need to screw on/off often. Even drop in filters are also a hassle and run a risk of breaking when dropped. Built -in ND filters have no such issues and no color shift.

The 2x price over BMPCC is not just on the AF or extra buttons but the speeding up of the whole filming workflow, reduce manpower and be able to price ourselves more competitively. Image quality comparison is not a concern to me because most modern cameras have excellent image and is a matter of preference.

Last edited 1 month ago by Kensh
A K
A K
Guest
September 24th, 2020

Very interesting. Canon is in full beast mode this year. The time code – but no SDI is a little bizarre and no AC seems like a giant oversight, I guess someone will manufacture a dummy battery ac solution.

Markus Magnon
Markus Magnon
Guest
September 24th, 2020

No raw recording format.
Just sayin.

Gerbert Floor
Member
September 24th, 2020

Like a lot of things about it, but I don’t like how Canon is not communicating about their current line up much. I’m a proud and happy owner of the c500 mk2, but since the release of the c300 mk2 and the r5, and now this camera, I see a lot of nice features that are being added that are not present on their top camera.

Ok, some of them are impossible to add, but at least make an effort with new firmware with at least a lower res slow motion option, or updated autofocus performance, or fix minor quirks like only 4k out with the SDI…

Christopher Dobey
Member
September 24th, 2020

If an ARRI rep can agree that their own PL mount is dead (Potato Jet’s interview) and bounces too much light around internally due to the now unnecessary flange distance compared to LPL, then bring on more RF cameras like this to replace EF. I’m looking at you Blackmagic!
And how about a Locking RF while we’re at it : )

Lyle Dylandy
Lyle Dylandy
Member
September 24th, 2020

There seem to be a minor typo on the link to C300 III Dynamic range test (like there’s this weird “%20” somewhere in the link due to formatting while pasting i think) , would you mind to fix it? Thanks!

Last edited 1 month ago by Lyle Dylandy
Lyle Dylandy
Lyle Dylandy
Member
September 24th, 2020
Reply to  Johnnie Behiri

Thanks for fixing it!

Evan Brandt
Evan Brandt
Member
September 24th, 2020

This is weird. I love the camera, and I’d pull the trigger today if it was $4000. It’d be cool if they allowed braw out the hdmi if they did I’d buy it tomorrow. It’s also weird that it’s 4K, when the bm 12k is shipping this week for less than double this camera. But it’s got a flippy screen and auto focus. Im so torn. No sdi makes me sad but it is what it is.

Lyle Dylandy
Lyle Dylandy
Member
September 24th, 2020
Reply to  Evan Brandt

This is so true. My guess is Canon is not allowing RAW to remove competition with C200… I would buy it in a heartbeat if its $4000 and allow braw.

Daniel
Daniel
Guest
September 24th, 2020

I think this is a great camera, but it is not competitive at this price point. You can get a BMPCC6k for less than half the price.

Canon is starting to not nerf their products, but they really need to look at what other companies are doing and what they are selling for.

alexandre Prod'homme
alexandre Prod'homme
Member
September 24th, 2020
Reply to  Daniel

A bit unfair. Why is everyone thinking Canon is not good value? It’s very well priced imo, sure: let’s look what other company do:
BMPCC6K: No autofocus, No ND filters and (Almost certainly) worst battery life. No RF mount.
You want RF? Komodo. More expensive! Lagging menu. No ND.
Meanwhile Canon offers so much.
Test needs to be done but if it’s anything like the c300 mkIII, the DGO also knock these two in terms of dynamic range.
Arguably world’s best autofocus?
Everyone seems to overlook that Canon is the native manufacturer of one of the most popular lens mount of all time, and it’s successor. No third party piece of gear or firmware, that must have some real value. Good ND filters come at a cost –and built in reduce all sort of artefact that stacking them in front of the lens causes.

Daniel
Daniel
Guest
September 24th, 2020

I hate auto-focus. I’d rather have control and not leave it to an algorithm. I like my vintage glass.
True, BMPCC6k has bad battery life, but you can buy a v-mount plate and battery and still have it cost less than this.
I also don’t care for Canon color science that much and certainly not their log profiles. If it output raw you could switch to a different color science, but that is not the case with this camera.
Just buy an ND filter, it’s still cheaper than this camera, in fact you probably have one already.
RF mount is overrated in my opinion. It’s just another mirror-less mount.

This camera is a mix of the BMPCC4k in form and the A7S3 in video features and is almost as expensive than either combined.

I would absolutely use this camera if it were competitively priced, but as it stands it’s not a bargain for me.

Last edited 1 month ago by Daniel Natzke
Markus Magnon
Markus Magnon
Guest
September 24th, 2020

You can get the Pocket 4k.
If you are recording on an SD the battery life IS 60 minutes which is really good.
I´ve tested Canon, baxxtor, SWIT, an original BM batteries.
Autofocus? It is cinema. I don´t need autofocus.
ND Filter. Get a magnet filter system for 100 Bucks. Done.

Also I don´t like the color science behind those Canon Cameras.
Blackmagic is closer to ARRI. And Blackmagic has a nice system
braw is pretty dope and If you work wit Davinc Resolve it one brand.
One company. You know that the camera is optimized for braw, and
Resolve is also optimized for braw.

braw is open SDK. Canon or others could work with it. But the did not even put raw light into their 4500 Euro camera.

canon5dsquared
canon5dsquared
Member
September 25th, 2020
Reply to  Markus Magnon

60 minutes is considered “good” to you for battery life? After reading that sentence I stopped because nothing else you say can be valid if you believe 60 minutes of recording time to an sd card is “really good”.

Markus Magnon
Markus Magnon
Guest
September 25th, 2020
Reply to  canon5dsquared

60 minutes is pretty good. Yes.
Did you ever work with ARRI or RED camera?
60 minutes is fine. You can also get a battery grip by BM and shoot for 2 hours.

canon5dsquared
canon5dsquared
Member
September 26th, 2020
Reply to  Markus Magnon

No, I have a C100 and I can get more than 60 minutes out of a single battery.

BrandAgnostic
BrandAgnostic
Guest
September 25th, 2020
Reply to  canon5dsquared

You might want to broaden your horizon, 60min is plenty for many shooter’s use cases.

canon5dsquared
canon5dsquared
Member
September 26th, 2020
Reply to  BrandAgnostic

I shoot with a C100 and get more than 60 minutes out of a single battery.

Adam Gaudreault
Adam Gaudreault
Member
September 25th, 2020

I agree with a lot of your assessment. I am a huge canon fan. I overpaid for the c100 mk2, and the c200. I loved them both. But i still know I overpaid for them. I also don’t mind autofocus. Plus with the new revoring products, i am okay not having internal NDs.

Also consider z-cam options. Consider a7s3 + a revoring does the same codecs, decent color science, and better in so many ways. Almost comparable AF (arguably the same), for $2k less.

I want the c70 badly. But at $5.5k there is no way. I might consider it at $4k. And if it was $3.5k and under, I’d jump on it immediately.

Also remember, while the batteries last longer, they cost like 3-10 times as others, and you still need to buy at least 2-3 extras to ensure a full 12hr shoot day. You could go v-mount, but that adds bulk/weight you might not want.

Generally speaking, canon released an amazing camera, with great features. It nails so many things right. I don’t care about raw so long as i got a good 10bit codec. But the price point is far too high compared to what’s offered by the competition.

Mike
Mike
Guest
September 24th, 2020
Reply to  Daniel

I had the BMPCC6k for 2 weeks but send it back (main reason was that it got no 4k hdmi out, which was a dealbreaker for our intended use, I missed that in the specs since I didnt expect such a weird limitation). But there are lots of other things to dislike (and like) on this camera.

I think this comparison is realy off. On paper alone the BMPC may be a bit better in some regards (for example 6k raw). But there is SO MUCH missing. And the C70 offers SO MUCH new.
Battery life is not usable. Period. Like NOT usable. We are speaking of 10-20 minutes runtime.
There is no (usable) af. Not even single AF before recording is usable.
The screen is fixed and (big but) very dark.
No ND Filter.

On the other hand: the C70 offers the best AF on the market, a swivel screen, Clog (though no raw (at the moment?)), better colors probably, a newer mount, the biggest native lense selection, better colors probably, certainly better battery life, certainly a better build body, certainly the better low light performance.

The price is not low, but its certainly a good price and a very new, very advanced Cinema Camera.
The BMPCC got an incredible good price/value but it also got a lot of shortcomings and compromises, which may make the work with it quite annoying. You absolutely need quite some rig for this camera, while the c70 can work fine just like it is ;)

Markus Magnon
Markus Magnon
Guest
September 25th, 2020
Reply to  Mike

Pockewt 4k and Pocket 6k user here. If you are using SD cards and set the monitor to 50%. (using an external monitor anyway) the batery life is 60 minutes on the pocket 4k and 45 minutes on the pocket 6k.

It is really frustrating that people stil say battery is UNUSABLE. That is simple not true.
Maybe update your firmware or switch from SSD to SD. Or get some new batteries.
Battery life is great. I only need 8 batteries doing the day. 8 LP-E6 and I am fine.
No need for V-Mount.

canon5dsquared
canon5dsquared
Member
September 25th, 2020
Reply to  Mike

The best summation of the BMPCC vs C70

“You absolutely need quite some rig for this camera, while the c70 can work fine just like it is ;)”

Eric Girgash
Eric Girgash
Member
September 24th, 2020

Incredible camera but I find it very odd that they state it’s an entry level camera hence no sdi out but they included an SDI timecode port?

visionrouge.net
visionrouge.net
Guest
September 24th, 2020

Another 80% done camera from Canon with killing limitations.
No EFV; Ok, I can add one.. but wait; no SDI?
So I should go for flimsy HDMI EVF?

It’s look like they took the DSLR shooting style and upgrade it to the maximum possible, but forget people filming in bright daylight.
Very weird looking camera with amazing feature overall.

Raw Shooter
Raw Shooter
Guest
September 24th, 2020

No internal RAW or SDI? That would have really finished it off for me. They should have made it 5 or 6k as well.

canon5dsquared
canon5dsquared
Member
September 25th, 2020

Canon knows people film in bright daylight, that’s why they have built-in ND filters. :-)

Jack Lensin
Jack Lensin
Guest
September 24th, 2020

Wow. Canon have really hit the ball out of the park with this one. Everything you need for a docu/indie shooter in one package. The best part is you can use the 24-105 as a f2.8 with the focal reducer and that’s all you will ever need.

Alvise Tedesco
Alvise Tedesco
Member
September 24th, 2020

Thanks for the preview. Other sources says sensor IS the same as the C300 mkIII. Who’s correct?

Admin
September 24th, 2020
Reply to  Alvise Tedesco

Hi Alvise.
Re-checking with Canon as we speak and I’ll update the article accordingly.
Thank you for your patience.

Johnnie

Admin
September 25th, 2020
Reply to  Alvise Tedesco

Hi Alvise. After checking again with Canon, the sensor is the same as the one found inside the Canon C300 MarK III.

Article is now updated. Sorry for the confusion.

Johnnie

Alvise Tedesco
Alvise Tedesco
Guest
September 25th, 2020
Reply to  Johnnie Behiri

Happy to help. Thanks again for your great reviews

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