Canon EOS R5 and R6 Overheating During Video Recording – Official Statement

July 14th, 2020
Canon EOS R5 and R6 Overheating During Video Recording - Official Statement

Canon just issued an official statement regarding the Canon EOS R5 and EOS R6 overheating during video recording. The company says they used a magnesium alloy body and “overheat control” for better heat management. Canon didn’t want to include a fan to keep the body compact and weather-sealed.  The EOS R5 can only record up to 20 minutes in 8K and up to 15 minutes in 4K 120fps. After that, the camera needs up to 20 minutes to recover before starting to record again.

Canon EOS R5/EOS R6 Overheating During Video Recording – Canon’s statement. Image credit: Canon/Unsplash

When Canon officially announced its new flagship full-frame mirrorless cameras – EOS R5 and EOS R6 – last week, there was one particular topic many people were talking about. The overheating issue (of the R5). Even before the whole debate began, I was asking myself how could have Canon managed it – packing 8K RAW recording in such a small camera body without an active fan. Panasonic, for example, decided to go with the fan in its LUMIX S1H which “only” has 6K and no internal RAW.

Internal 8K RAW recording is indeed a huge technological challenge (hearing RED Monstro and RED Helium dual-fans in the background) and certain compromises had to be made. Today, Canon issued an official statement about the Canon EOS R5/EOS R6 overheating issue. Let’s take a look at it.

Details Regarding Canon EOS R5/EOS R6 Overheating During Video Recording

Here is Canon’s full statement, unedited:

The EOS R5, one of the latest additions to Canon’s full-frame mirrorless camera line, offers class-leading autofocus with high-resolution and high frame rate video recording options using the maximum width of the full-frame sensor at high bit rates.  Inevitably, this combination of features has the potential to generate some significant heat, which will limit recording time.

Canon has taken several steps to manage the potential for overheating, including:

  • Magnesium alloy was used in the body to dissipate heat away from internal components
  • An “overheat control” function to reduce heat generation when the camera is in standby

In regard to the installation of a fan: The decision not to install a fan within the body was made in order to maintain the EOS R5’s compact size, lightweight construction, and weather resistance.

Before recording starts, the EOS R5 and EOS R6 display an estimate of the recordable time based on the current camera temperature and the set recording mode.

Canon has published and included below the approximate recording and estimated recovery times for 23°C / 73°F environments and ensures that the camera will warn users when it is getting too hot. Additionally, tips to reduce overheating as well as recovering time are listed below.

Canon EOS R5/EOS R6 Overheating – Recording Times. Source: Canon

How can you reduce heat buildup in the EOS R5?

  • Set Overheat Control function to “ON” (default). When the overheat control function is enabled, the movie size and frame rate are automatically changed while the camera is in standby mode to suppress the rise of the internal temperature
  • Between recordings, it is recommended to turn off the camera
  • Position the camera out of direct sunlight
  • Use an external fan to dissipate heat

How long will it take for the camera to recover?

Estimated camera recovery times are indicated below. The time until full record time is available will vary with ambient temperature, continued camera operation, and the selected shooting resolution.

Canon EOS R5/EOS R6 Overheating – Recovery Times. Source: Canon

What about the EOS R6?

Like the EOS R5, the EOS R6 offers powerful movie recording and stills capabilities within a compact body design. At the highest frame rates and resolutions, heat is inevitably generated. We believe the EOS R6 offers the best in class performance, especially for enthusiast photographers and video content creators.

The EOS R6 can record up to the 29 minutes 59 seconds recording limit in the 5.1K oversampled 4K 60p mode at (23°C / 73°F) before encountering any heat-related issues within the camera and up to 40 minutes of 4K at 30p.

I think it is important that Canon openly talks about this and issues a statement like this even before they actually ship these cameras. Technological innovations always come with challenges and sometimes limitations. Don’t forget that 8K RAW footage from the EOS R5 has a bitrate of roughly 2600Mbps. 20 minutes of 8K RAW footage will, therefore, fill almost 400GB on your memory card. For longer clips, you could always go with the 8K All-Intra or 8K IPB codec to save some space, but the overheating limit stays the same as with RAW.

What do you think about the Canon EOS R5 and EOS R6 cameras? Are the recording limits connected with overheating a deal-breaker for you? Let us know in the comment section below the article.

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Richard van den Boogaard
MemberJuly 16th, 2020

Seriously – who *needs* 8k?

ʀʏɴ ?????
ʀʏɴ ?????
GuestJuly 14th, 2020

If you need to record 15 minutes of 4K 120fps, sorry but I’m going to seriously question your sanity. ?

Lloyd Surdi
Lloyd Surdi
GuestJuly 14th, 2020

i guess you don’t film much

Philip Bloom
MemberJuly 14th, 2020

15 minutes isn’t much. Remember it is cumulative and often you are recording trying to get the perfect moment.

 Max Forest
Max Forest
MemberJuly 14th, 2020

Seriously… what do people expect.
This thing can already do 4K 30P – APSC and Full Frame without over heating. Thats amazing!

You need a video powerhouse with no overheating…
Get a C200, you’ll wonder why you ever fiddled building up your camera every time compared to grab and go.

If your serious about video… get a C200, the R5 is a Camera first and video is a great addition, makes for a good powerful tool but not a camera A, you can but its not ideal.

Building up your R5 with (Cage, Monitor, Pre-Amp/Recorder, ND-Filters…) compared to Open Bag, Shoot.

Canon did good with this R5 and I’ll be picking one up as a camera B for video, 8K RAW. It will be perfect to crop into or create movement/pans. Not worried one bit about any 15-20 minute recording times… my C200 has me covered. ;)

Jim Wilson
MemberJuly 14th, 2020

Well said Max, that is a calm and rational approach to the whole situation. You may have brought me back around picking mine up when it arrives.

Jilt Wilcomb
Jilt Wilcomb
GuestJuly 17th, 2020

This is why people buy external recorders. Atomos is in business because, to this day, it’s still not physically possible to cram this much processing into a cramped enclosure without a fan.

Johnnie Behiri
Johnnie Behiri
AdminJuly 17th, 2020

Testing the Canon R6. 4K/23.98p, outdoor, 20 degrees Celsius, cloudy, light rain, nothing special. 20 minutes into (Non constant) recording the camera shows signs of stress and a few minutes later, game over.

Not a good start. Will keep reporting. Stay tuned.

Nick Jossendal
Nick Jossendal
GuestJuly 14th, 2020

Ugh, this is a thing again? I remember Canon DSLR’s consistently overheating like 10 years ago.

Ali AlRuwithi
Ali AlRuwithi
GuestJuly 14th, 2020

Omg ?

 Allan Templeton
Allan Templeton
MemberJuly 17th, 2020

I will hang on to my GH5 as it can record indefinitely, R5-R6 Pass!!

Matthew Graci
Matthew Graci
GuestJuly 14th, 2020

For my use, time limits are fine, but these numbers are in ideal conditions. More concerned about time limit for 4k /60 in the summer when my vacation destination is 95F (https://t.co/AbXMYGIul4)

 Mark Boardman
Mark Boardman
MemberJuly 16th, 2020

I’m just going to buy 3 R5s so when the first 1 overheats I’ll switch to the other then so on. Sounds reasonable to me!

Kaster Troy
Kaster Troy
MemberJuly 17th, 2020

Thats the most sane thing anyone has said so far lol. I like it.

Bart Lenski
Bart Lenski
GuestJuly 14th, 2020

Cannon branded ice cooling packs coming next :)

Kaster Troy
Kaster Troy
MemberJuly 17th, 2020

RIP

 Patrick Grossien
Patrick Grossien
MemberJuly 14th, 2020

Won’t be long before there will be dual fan rigs by all the well known rig builders. And if they didn’t think of it yet, they should now. ?
Shooting with a DSLR i often use a rig anyway. So why not.

Can’t eat the cake and have it, too ?
It’s already amazing they packed it all in there the way they did. There have to be some trade offs or everybody else would be doing it too

Richard van den Boogaard
MemberJuly 16th, 2020

You can have any amount of fans placed against the outside of this weather sealed camera and it still hardly cools off the heat trapped inside…

 Allan Templeton
Allan Templeton
MemberJuly 17th, 2020

Best to carry a portable ice cooling block!!

Michael Z.
Michael Z.
GuestJuly 14th, 2020

It would be interesting if it would be possible to come up with a battery grip that adds extra cooling … but for usual shooting I don’t see a big chance to run into any overheating issues …

Eugenia L
MemberJuly 14th, 2020

I don’t see it as a huge problem for narrative work (since most scenes don’t take more than a couple of minutes until cut, and then you have to re-adjust the scene anyway which gives time to the camera to cool down). Overheating is only a problem for weddings or other events (it doesn’t overheat in 4k/30 btw). Personally, I pre-ordered the R6, which doesn’t seem to overheat. I don’t really need 8k or raw anyway. My only gripe with these cameras is the micro HDMI that breaks too easily.

A smart product idea would be to add passive cooling behind the screen, a larger version of what you can see on some Raspberry Pi mini-computers. The heat comes out from the back of the screen (that’s why Canon recommends to have the screen open to the side). Of course, that would mean that you can’t close the screen back, but hey.

Stephen Kraus
Stephen Kraus
GuestJuly 15th, 2020

The R6 apparently overheats more than the R5 due to the fact that it’s ALWAYS oversampling. Source: https://youtu.be/apIsXLzNlPM

The Canon proAV QA is also really solid for info.

Jonathan S Grijalva
Jonathan S Grijalva
GuestJuly 15th, 2020

It does overheat in the downsampled 4k, the lower quality 4k is pixel binned and not as good. Also, regarding your comment about this camera in narrative work…. it does produce heat just when it’s on and the viewfinder and/or screen are being used. Which I would assume you will be doing in between cuts to check your exposure/framing/wb. So the heat will be continuing and even building up. I think that is something to consider. It will be a pain to just turn your camera off every 3-5 minutes.

Jilt Wilcomb
Jilt Wilcomb
GuestJuly 17th, 2020

That’s why its particularly lame that the R5 doesn’t shoot raw. WTF?

Jilt Wilcomb
Jilt Wilcomb
GuestJuly 17th, 2020

There’s no excuse for micro-HDMI or micro-USB. That’s essentially ruined on day one.

The lack of raw on the R5 sucks, though. Why is there no 4K raw? Canon always manages to gimp its products in some glaring way.

Royal
Royal
GuestJuly 14th, 2020

It is doesn’t make sense to buy this camera for video. My GH5s is better than this Canon .

Klaus
Klaus
GuestJuly 14th, 2020

No it isn’t

Philip Bloom
MemberJuly 14th, 2020

Intelligent discussion there…

 Allan Templeton
Allan Templeton
MemberJuly 17th, 2020

Yes but for video: the GH5 isat least ya will not need to carry a portable ice block with ya, lol!!

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