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Which Mid-Range Camera Should I Get? – Gear Guide Spotlight

December 4th, 2021 Jump to Comment Section 4
Which Mid-Range Camera Should I Get? – Gear Guide Spotlight

To achieve pro results, you need a high-end camera, right? Well, not so fast. Sometimes a decent upper mid-range camera will do. It’s much more important what you are filming than what tool you are using. Check out our Gear Guide to the Best Cameras – under $5,000 for a good selection of decent filming machines. Let’s take a look!

So filming is more than just a hobby for you, and you want something real to work with. On the other hand, a full-blown high-end cinema camera might be a bit too much for both your needs and your wallet. So let’s take a look at the middle ground.

Gear Guide
Sony FX3 and Sony a7S III – Non Identical Siblings. Image credit CineD

Gear Guide – Best Cameras under $5,000

In the $2,000 to $5,000 range, there are many really great cameras to be found. A few years back these cameras would have been super expensive (or even impossible to build), but nowadays things have changed. Take the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K Pro (what a mouthful!), that’s a beast of a camera, but it’s still priced just under $2,500.

Most mirrorless cameras in the sub-$5,000 category offer many features that are usually only available on high-end cameras. But you have to be careful, as most of the cameras in this category also lack some important things, such as internal ND filters (although the BMPCC 6K Pro has them).

Gear Guide
BMPCC 6K Pro With Laowa Ooom Lens 2. Image credit: CineD

You need high-end slow-motion recording, for example 4K120p? Then the Sony a7S III is exactly what you need! Other neat features include pro-grade audio preamps, tiltable screens, connections for external recording, you name it.

A-Cam or 2nd Unit

Another typical scenario for cameras in this category is to use them as a supplement to an existing high-end camera. Let’s say you have a Canon C500 Mark II and want to complement it with another, but lower priced B-cam. In this case, a C200B, for example, would be worth a closer look.

Gear Guide
Canon C200B. Image credit: Canon

In summary, cameras in the sub-$5,000 category offer both a great entry point into high-quality image acquisition and the ability to build a complete set with other higher-end cameras. The difference here is no longer in image quality (at least not as much), but mainly in the lack of pro-level connectivity options such as TC, external lens control systems, and built-in mounts for pro batteries.

Gear Guides

In our Gear Guides, you’ll find a variety of cameras, lenses, lights, and more. Our goal is to help you make the best choice when buying new gear. Of course, we can’t list everything, that would be pointless. We prefer to select the best products from each category and link to our reviews, lab tests and news articles to help you make a smart purchase.

Link: Gear Guides

What is your typical A-Cam? Do you use B-Cams from this category? Share your experiences in the comments below!

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