Sony Creates World’s Fastest SD Card

February 24th, 2017
Sony Creates World's Fastest SD Card

Sony has introduced the worlds fastest SD card, the SF-G Series with 299MB/s write speed, catering for capturing 4K and high-speed video content.

As the demand for higher resolutions, deeper color bit-depth and larger data rates consume the video and film production world, the recording media we use needs constant updating in order to keep up. To meet the demand of increasing media efficiency, less buffer and faster write and read speeds when working in higher resolutions, Sony has introduced the new SF-G series of SD cards. Their new firmware, which allows for write speeds of up to 299MB/s, makes them ideal for capturing large bursts of RAW images for photography, or high-speed shooting in large resolutions. It also makes them, for now at least, the world’s fastest SD card.

A memory card reader will also be available that allows for the super-fast read time of up to 300MB/s via USB3, which can dramatically reduce the time needed to ingest the captured files.

Sony SF-G Series - the World's Fastest SD Card

Sony SF-G Series – the World’s Fastest SD Card

The Sony SF-G Series UHS-II SD cards will be available in 32GB, 64GB and 128GB sizes, catering for many types of users and cameras in the field of video and filming, including DSLRs, mirrorless cameras like the Sony a7S II or the Panasonic Lumix GH5, but also video cameras like the Sony FS5 that can record both slow motion and 4K, and which demand stable and reliable recording media.

What is interesting about this is that Sony cameras typically record X-AVC video files at 50Mbps for 1080p and 100Mbps for UHD 4K. Yes, other cameras will record at 200Mbps, but could this mean Sony has something up their sleeve that would need a write speed of up to 299Mbps? Could this be a hint to a new resolution or format for future cameras?

The Sony SF-G series of SD cards will be available in 3 sizes at the end of March of 2017.

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 Daan Venmans
Daan Venmans
Member
March 1st, 2017

There is also a new type of speed. V30, V60 & V90 it is called. Panasonic will come with new SD cards as well in this class. It means a minimum write speed of 30MBps, 60MBps & 90MBps. The last one, V90, would therefore be able to record 8K footage! Because of the minimum write speed, the SD card would also be more stable and has less potential to fluctuate between different write speeds. This means a new dimension for SD card shooters like myself. Also these V90 cards will be able to record the 4:3 5k footage and the 400mbps 10 bit 4:2:2 4k footage of the new Panasonic GH5.

Keep in mind that the price of 128GB will increase, because of this new SD format!

 Stephen DeVore
Stephen DeVore
Member
March 1st, 2017

I became slightly confused when it said “need a write speed of up to 299Mbps”.

Palmer Woodrow
Palmer Woodrow
Member
March 1st, 2017
Reply to  Stephen DeVore

Indeed. That’s only 37 MBps, so the touted rates of the new card wouldn’t even come into play.

 Stephen DeVore
Stephen DeVore
Member
March 1st, 2017

Adam, can you please confirm the speeds in your article snippet?

I have an SD card that records at 100 MB per second, so if the article is correct in the way it is using abbreviations for at least the card itself, then that is intriguing.

I agree that it usually seems that the SD cards are listed in megabytes per second, while the cameras that I have seen typically list their speeds of recording in megabits per second.

If one means megabyte, then both the M and the B should be capitalized.

If one means megabit, then only the M is capitalized, and the B is lowercase.

Prices?

 Daan Venmans
Daan Venmans
Member
February 25th, 2017

Hello,

I have a quick note. The record speed of camera’s is always expressed in Megabits/second while the read and write speed of a memory card (in this case a SD card) is in MegaBytes/second. Two different things. (Mb/s & MB/s)

Keep making content!

 Luke Wen
Luke Wen
Member
February 25th, 2017
Reply to  Daan Venmans

Thanks for pointing that out!

Also these numbers are not for real world sustained write performance which is essential for video recording. Sony quotes minimum 30MB/s for sequential write which translates to around 240Mb/s.

Palmer Woodrow
Palmer Woodrow
Member
March 1st, 2017
Reply to  Adam Plowden

It still says, “could this mean Sony has something up their sleeve that would need a write speed of up to 299Mbps?”

This doesn’t really follow, since that’s only 37 MBps.

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