Canon EOS R6 Review First Look with Footage – Serious Limitation, Doubtful Video Tool

July 24th, 2020

The Canon EOS R6 will be shipping later this month and we were lucky enough to get a pre-production model and put the camera through its paces. I’m sure you guys are curious to find out how well it functioned in the field and if I noticed any overheating issues. So let’s dive into my Canon EOS R6 review. (Mind you that my opinion and overview of this camera are based on using a pre-production Canon R6 and the above video and writing reflects my own opinion after working with it.)

Canon EOS R6. Image credit: cinema5D

The Canon EOS R6 arrived at my home late last week and as I normally do with all other yet to be reviewed new cameras, I left it next to the entrance door in its original box for a day. Just an old belief that a camera deserves to get used to its new home before becoming a temporary family member and an attempt to allow me the extra time to finish other ongoing reviews…

Now after doing the aftermath, this was the only day that the Canon EOS R6 and I made friends as in all honesty, nothing has prepared me to what’s about to come.

I have been in this business for a day or two, met a few people who are behind the making of those wonderful advanced tools, so as a professional user, I have A LOT of respect to what those guys plan, manufacture, deliver, and do. But nothing has prepared me for the encounter I was about to have with the Canon R6. After all, I’ve seen many happy faces of cheerful Canon ambassadors raving about its video quality and ease of use. Testing the Canon 1D X Mark III lately made me believe that I’m about to use “the next best thing”. As always, if you are interested in purchasing this camera, I advise you to do your own homework, check other sources of information, and buy from a reputable seller in case that you have to return it if it does not match your expectations.

Canon EOS R6 – Three wheels control. Image credit: cinema5D

Canon EOS R6 – What’s new

There is A LOT to like in this new camera. Solid 4K picture up to 60fps. 1080 up to 120fps (love the Canon warm colors), non cropped full Frame, internal 10-bit, 4:2:2 recording (H.265, IBP), great Auto Focus in all filming modes. great IBIS (in-body image stabilization), C-Log, HDR PQ, and more.

IBIS:

EVERYTHING in the above short documentary (excluding the main interview with Neal) was shot handheld! As you can see, the IBIS in this camera is working remarkably and can easily imitate “tripod-like” steady shots. It is also very good when following people. Yes, there is a certain crop when using the strongest stabilizing mode, but personally, I prefer this than having shaky images.

One thing to remember when using a stabilized RF lens. When turning IBIS OFF, there is still some stabilizing going on, I guess from the lens itself (while in “ON” mode).

Auto Focus: 

I think there is no need to introduce Canon’s famous Dual Pixel Auto Focus function as it is one of the best (if not the best) currently in the market. The EOS R6 (and EOS R5), continues this tradition by deploying an improved version of this function, the Dual Pixel CMOS AF II. Be it by touching the LCD screen or by activating the back “jog stick” (activating in the camera menu), the autofocus will work most of the time like a treat! The Canon AF system is one of those that will allow you to film an interview for example, on a camera without an operator next to it knowing that focus can be tracked well even if your subject of filming moved a bit while filming.

Other features worth noticing:

  • Fully articulated screen. While this is not new, I like the way it is implemented. One can connect mic/headphone to the camera body without “fearing” of limiting the LCD screen position while filming
  • Audio quality. I really like the sound quality coming out of this little camera. When taking a closer look, there is also a way to record “uncompress audio” by choosing a specific setting in the menu. While I acknowledge that this mirrorless camera is not part of Canon’s video line, I hope that future models will allow direct connectivity to some advanced audio attachment à la Sony and Panasonic.
Canon EOS R6 – Easy video menu access. Image credit: cinema5D

Canon EOS R6 – What Deserves Attention

While working in C-log, there is a way to use “view assist” in order to bring “color back” to the flat image. While this is a very welcomed feature that can help with judging the images you are filming, the key feature to its usability is accuracy. The Canon R6 offers BT2020 and REC709 color overlay, but unfortunately, I do find the REC709 to be inaccurate (color-wise), at least in the pre-production camera I tested. Similar view assist functionality is found in cameras made by other manufacturers too.

We did not yet test the Canon EOS R6 in our lab for Dynamic Range and Rolling Shutter effect results (we will do so when having the final model in our hands), but from what I could already notice while filming, the rolling shutter effect seems to be horrendous.

Lowlight capabilities: unfortunately I was not able to specifically test the lowlight capabilities of the camera and will do so when and if we get it next time.

Menu structure and body controls: I truly like the idea of being able to control much of the basic camera functionality by being able to assign functions to the main 3 wheels. When it comes to the camera menu, after a short struggle, I managed to assign and access everything I needed very easily. When I write “struggle”, I mean that at first, it looked as if the camera has “too few buttons” to assign function to, but actually, that was not the case as most if not all the needed video functions could be accessed via the “Q” button (after assigning specific functions).

Canon EOS R6 – LCD screen and mic socket. Image credit: cinema5D

Canon R6 – In the Field

Everything was ready for me to execute my next short documentary. I do those short films knowing that they will never change the world but on the other hand, might inspire others (next to satisfy my passion to tell and share human stories). Neal Somchand and Mari Fujii-san (double “i” is correct here), both were kind enough to open a small window to their daily activity and culinary state of mind and the Canon R6 seemed to be the perfect candidate to support me in visually telling their story. And let me tell you, boy I was wrong!

I’m one of those who got really excited when Canon announced two new mirrorless cameras (EOS R5 and EOS R6). Besides the obvious healthy competition, I was happy to see Canon going back to its roots by trying to redefine the mirrorless camera market again with new innovative working tools. The move to win the heart of video content creators back seemed very welcomed. (My last adventure filming with a Canon mirrorless camera was a bit over 18 months ago when I took the Canon EOS R to India and filmed a mini wedding documentary).

Back to the topic of “in the field”, with some awesome features I was hoping to conduct a successful filming day but at some point, it all started to go wrong.

Canon EOS R6 – Overheating warning. Image credit: cinema5D
anon R6 – Overheat control “on”: When this function is enabled, the movie size and frame rate are automatically changed while the camera is in standby mode to to suppress the rise of the internal temperature

Record Time Limitations and the Overheating Issue

Of course, I was aware of the overheating issue and Canon’s advisory on how to try and combat it next to the imposed recording time limits. Yet, “data on paper” is one thing and experience on the filed is another and let me tell you, if you thought that the overheating issue is bad, think twice. It is certainly worse than what you can imagine!

Recording time imitations is one thing but overheating shutdown in unexpected points of the filming day is truly an obstacle. Furthermore, the recovery time is long (or at least seems to be long when you are under pressure to resume filming as your talents are all waiting). As my frustration grew, I tried it all. Ice bag on the camera, strong fan pointing directly to the sensor glass (yes, at some point I did not care anymore about exposing the sensor to the strong wind as long as I can resume filming)… I also tried looking up at the sky and mumble a few words (if it doesn’t help, it won’t hurt for sure I thought). I even made promises to be a nicer person and a good friend. All for the sake of seeing the camera working again, BUT, no evil. The weather-sealed camera body did a “great job” by doing what it supposed to do, and not let anything enter it. Not even the fresh fan air…

Frustrated as hell, I had to apologize to Mari Fujii-san and Neal. Some of the best images I was supposed to capture that day were missed. Other actions had to be repeated and if it was not enough, at some point I had the “genius idea” of lowering the resolution to Full HD and continue shooting, just not to waste their time. This method worked to some extent, but not all the time. Some of the kitchen images you see in this video were upscaled from full HD to 4K in order to match the rest of the footage.

Bottom line, the Canon EOS R6 controlled my filming day instead of me controlling it in order to tell a visual story.

Canon EOS R6 with ice cubes. Image credit: cinema5D
Canon EOS R6 – Overheating issue, no help from the fan. Image credit: cinema5D

Conclusion

I’m truly sorry to report that the Canon EOS R6 is not working for me. When filming, one needs a reliable tool that can sustain the dynamic nature of a production day (indoor/outdoor filming, Different temperatures, and such). The camera I had is a pre-production model but as Canon representative stated, “almost final”. I truly hope that something can be done in order to “ease the pain” and at least shorten the “in between” camera start up times. Not a perfect solution at all, but maybe it can help some.

The above sample footage has been shot on a Canon EOS R6 pre-production model. 4K/24p (and at times 1080/24p which later upscaled to match the rest of the timeline footage), Canon Log and graded with Lutify.me.  Music: epidemicsound

A big thank you for Neal Somchand and Mari Fujii-san. Her cookbook (Fresh Vegetable Dishes from the Temples of Japan), can be ordered here. Neal can be reached by sending him a direct email

Canon EOS R6 – Ice cubes on camera during an interview. Image credit:cinema5D

Did you pre order the Canon EOS R6? If yes, what are your expectations? Will you tolerate overheating issues during your production day? Please share with us your thoughts in the comment section below. 

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Anthimos Tsikras
Anthimos Tsikras
Member
September 11th, 2020

Hi Johnnie, do you think you could film your little documentary with the R6 and the new Firmware now without the limitations you figured out? For my purpose the R6 is the right tool, but I have a proper cinema camera for long time recordings.

FOTOSPRING
Guest
July 29th, 2020

wow your article was really helpful and informativ.
thank you.

Jochen Isensee
Jochen Isensee
Guest
July 28th, 2020

Beautiful documentary it’s sad that you couldn’t finish it.
A very basic test before the shooting would have shown that you are going to run into problems though.

Roger
Roger
Guest
July 30th, 2020
Reply to  Jochen Isensee

The shoot is the test, though. It’s a real-world test. Every 5D review is like this.

canon5dsquared
canon5dsquared
Member
July 28th, 2020

I hate to break it to the Cinema5D community but this article was written after other content creators already got there hands on a full production model of the EOS-R5. Non canon ambassadors have reviewed the EOS-R5 and have real world time stats for the different video modes of the R5. This just means pre production really is pre production no matter what Canon boasts to you about how final a camera may or may not be. And if you’re going to bring a pre production camera to a shoot and expect it to function like a full production model (or perhaps even a cinema camera) should we really be listening to your advise?

sam broggs
sam broggs
Member
July 27th, 2020

So i will post again. Thanks for the great video and review! A great video despite all the camera limitations. But how did you record audio? There is some hiss in the interviews and it sounds very bassy. Did you record straight in camera?

 Iain Philpott
Iain Philpott
Member
July 27th, 2020

It’s interesting reading all the comments. People need to remember this is a ‘STILLS’ camera – that shoots a bit of video, if needed. It is not a video camera. If you need 8K video buy a RED – there is a reason they are more expensive! Seriously the R5 is a game changer for stills. It will be a huge success. Right tool – right job. Its simple.

Roger
Roger
Guest
July 27th, 2020
Reply to  Iain Philpott

I don’t think that is how Canon is characterizing this camera. They listed is features with the following statement:

“Canon revolutionized the video industry with the introduction of the EOS 5D Mark II which provided solutions for what was previously seen as improbable – the EOS R5 will again push the boundaries of what filmmakers can do compared to current DSLR and Mirrorless cameras.”

It’s not competing with RED cameras, it’s competing with other hybrid video/stills cameras (including Sony a7III, A7R4, Panasonic S1) etc.
Canon’s own video line has cameras like the C200.

While positioned as competition to the above, this body also has serious limitations in actual use as the review pointed out.

Roger
Roger
Guest
July 27th, 2020
Reply to  Roger

That was the R5, for the R6 it’s similar but less boundary-pushing:

“The EOS R6 full-frame mirrorless camera is designed to meet the demands of both photographers and video content creators who want a strong and versatile camera to keep up with their active lives. It can go from photographing high-speed action sports to filming 4K cinematic video with ease thanks to its high-performance CMOS sensor and DIGIC X image processor.”

Iain Philpott
Iain Philpott
Guest
July 27th, 2020

It’s interesting reading all the comments. People need to bear in mind this is a ‘STILLS’ camera that can shoot a bit of video. Seriously its a stills camera first and foremost. It is NOT a video camera. If you need proper 8K then buy a RED. There is a reason the RED is more expensive. Make no mistake about it the R5 is a game changer in terms of stills photography and will be a rip-roaring success!

Victor Leung
Victor Leung
Guest
July 27th, 2020

First of all I thank you for the overheat test and I learn a lot as an amateur photographer. In particular, there are a lot of interesting thoughts/conservations from professional video/photographers in the reply section. Whenever there is test/review video on R5/R6, it follows by criticism surrounding overheat, ignoring what is physics, APS-C vs Full frame, professional vs amateur usage, and etc.

Nonetheless, I think that no matter R5 or R6, it is not designed for professional video shooting usage. Just like Lamborghini launches a Sian and then a Dakar Rally racer test an unmodified model in off-road. Yes you can drive a Sian under some off-road situation but remember it is not a Urus. Besides, if you prepare to use it on tour rally situation you better prepare a back up car as this is no longer an amateur game. Even my friend ask me to shoot video for his wedding despite he has already hired videographers, I also prepare a back up camera myself.

 Ashit Tandon
Ashit Tandon
Member
July 26th, 2020

Excellent documentary. I think the quality of the documentary gets lost in all this discussion of overheating. Great stuff. I remember you had shot a similar style documentary when u reviewed the fuji xt4. Do u recollect if you were inconvenienced by the XT4 at the time? Just wondering because the XT4’s thermal management is also limited

sam broggs
sam broggs
Member
July 26th, 2020

Thats strange.
My comments have not been published

 Miklos Nemeth
Member
July 26th, 2020

Possibly the people at AP had the chance to experiment with R5/R6 and their conclusion was that Sony is the way to go. I used to have a terribly overheating camera, and your are totally right, never again an overheating camera, I wouldnt want to adjust my style because of a stupid camera, I would reluctant to accept that the camera controls me, no way. With the A6400 Sony is releasing all its cameras without the 29.59 minute video recording limit: A6600, A7RIV are all “video cameras” in this sense, since they have no this recording time limit any more. Canon and Nikon still insist on imposing this 29.59 limit. Overheating is definitely kicking in a lot earlier.

 Patrick Chase
Patrick Chase
Member
July 25th, 2020

One more remark: When it comes to thermal management, firmware matters almost as much as (and sometimes more than) hardware.

Lest anybody forget, the A7SII had absolutely horrible thermal performance when it came to market, but later firmwares release improved it quite a bit and enabled the camera to reach its eventual stature as a pro-worthy tool. IIRC the A7R3 also improved over time as Sony fine-tuned its video modes. I’m sure there are similar examples from other makers as well (and as a recovering firmware developer I know of many stories of post-intro thermal/power “turnarounds” from other product types).

I think that a final verdict will have to wait until we see optimized HW and FW (and as in the case of the A7SII the latter may not happen until after the camera comes to market). At the very least Johnnie’s experience [re-]illustrates the perils of early adoption, though.

 Chris Sugden-Smith
Chris Sugden-Smith
Member
July 25th, 2020

Hi Johnnie,

Thank you for not quitting, and managing to bring a sense of both Neil Somchand and Mari Fujii-san expressing the values they are committed to living, in spite of the technical frustration you experienced. Ironically their conversation centered around the value of responding, not just re-acting, values some of the commentators obviously missed.

I enjoy your determination to use the small, truly handheld, stills/video cameras for solo filming, as well as your choice of subjects which allow an insight, however briefly, into positive aspects, and attitudes to being alive in difficult times, against so much general media negativity and fixation on ‘jeopardy’.

And ‘equipment testing’ this way is also a far more real measure of giving context to the marketing claims put out by the manufactures. Yes there are more dedicated, more expensive options, yet in documentary work the need to be as ‘minimalist’ and unobtrusive as possible would suggest the truly small form factor, unadorned by various ‘rigs’, relying on efficient IBIS and auto-focus is a sector waiting on ‘real solutions’.

Thanks again for the film and the work done.

Chris.

Jared Ba
Jared Ba
Guest
July 25th, 2020

Did you ever try applying the ice pack with the lens off (draping over the sensor without touching it)? I know you shouldn’t have to do this but still curious.

Chris
Chris
Guest
July 25th, 2020

And now there’s also a cooling element for the R5 already :-) https://tilta.com/2020/07/tiltaing-camera-cage-for-canon-r5/

ken
ken
Guest
July 25th, 2020

strange, But this is canon R6, Canon confirm that on You tube interview(not mentioning name) with Mehdia Mehtal that there’s no overheating when shooting in 4k 24p or 30p.

Colin Daggitt
Colin Daggitt
Member
July 25th, 2020

Had big hopes for the R5/R6. I want canon lenses, [email protected], dual pixel auto-focus autofocus. I do not want a cinema camera S35mm. Rolling shutter is inevitable at this price point. What to do? 1DXMK3?

Psdigipix
Guest
July 25th, 2020

When buying a dslr or mirrorless for filming purposes you’d better look for a real filmcamera that is developed for the purpose you’re looking for.

Noah
Noah
Member
July 25th, 2020

This is a photography camera that can be used to shoot short clips with full frame dof and canon amazing colors. It is not a documentary/short film production camera. I guess that you are taking the issue personal here, I can see that from your replies to comments “I was not using a stopwatch here” they were asking about timings for overheating and it is the subject of this whole article!

Relax man…..

If you have an issue with Canon you better change your website name to something other than 5D! maybe CinamaGFX100 because you like FujiFilm

AAkhan
AAkhan
Guest
July 26th, 2020
Reply to  Noah

Grow up, due. This is a video website and you are whining why he tested video capability of a camera Canon gave him?

Noah
Noah
Member
July 28th, 2020
Reply to  AAkhan

I know this is a video website, but the camera is a hybrid camera! and sure he can test its capabilities, which includes quality, dynamic range, codecs, color, rolling shutter, AF, IBIS, screen, build quality, etc. This is not a camera to shoot documentaries. In addition, Canon has stated all the filming duration limitations so why moan about it. Definitely we all wish it has no limitations but that is the case unfortunately….

reem
reem
Guest
July 25th, 2020

I would be pretty upset if this happened to me with a production version, but I can’t imagine taking a preproduction unit to a real job.

Richard Ramos
Richard Ramos
Guest
July 25th, 2020

Thank you for the sincere review and nice video. Japanese cuisine looks both healthy and delicious. It seems like that man is mastering the art of Japanese food.

On the other hand, I think that you need to get a sound man for your documentaries. There are times when the sounds clips in this particular video.

It seems like a hybrid camera just won’t be a serious contender to a proper video camcorder (overheating). Especially when talking Canon and its legendary colour science.

 Tom McGovern
Tom McGovern
Member
July 25th, 2020

Sadly it seems you didn’t do your homework, the R6 can and does overheat in all modes. Only the R5 is rated for unlimited (by heat) use at 4K

Andrey
Andrey
Guest
July 25th, 2020

amazing footage, beautiful colours, excellent and interesting work.
thanks a lot for sharing it and your inspirations!

Tobias Mennle
Tobias Mennle
Member
July 25th, 2020

… the “doubtful” in your title is too friendly.

Tobias Mennle
Tobias Mennle
Member
July 25th, 2020

Johnnie, thank you, much appreciated. A very nice, interesting little doc and very well filmed. Really watched it with pleasure. Could imagine this in a longer form and with more space, less music.

Andrew Reid would surely not have done better cinematography wise ;) , but his brand is more about being a poisonous a…..e anyway. Although a critical, very entertaining one, so he is needed and sometimes appreciated, too.

Image quality looks decent. Overheating drama I totally expected, simply by having used and looked at the S1H with its huge fan/cooling design. Which on the other hand makes the S1H a really unattractive still camera.

Even Canon cannot beat physics, its as simple as that. Slim still camera (R6) or bulky but reliable video camera (S1H), that’s the choice.

Your review is another proof for me that the hybrid concept is not interesting for professional documentary filming, except for special purposes/c-camera. That includes the S1H which should have been an EVA2 right away.

Losing images due to a slow, unreliable camera is a deadly sin.

Tobias Mennle
Guest
July 25th, 2020

Johnnie, thank you, much appreciated. A very nice, interesting little doc and very well filmed. Really watched it with pleasure. Could imagine this in a longer form and with more space, less music.

Andrew Reid would surely not have done better cinematography wise ;) , but his brand is more about being a poisonous a…..e anyway. Although a critical, very entertaining one, so he is needed and sometimes appreciated, too.

Image quality looks decent. Overheating drama I totally expected, simply by having used and looked at the S1H with its huge fan/cooling design. Which on the other hand makes the S1H a really unattractive still camera.

Even Canon cannot beat physics, its as simple as that. Slim still camera (R6) or bulky but reliable video camera (S1H), that’s the choice.

Your review is another proof for me that the hybrid concept is not interesting for working professionals. That includes the S1H which should have been an EVA2 right away.

 Patrick Chase
Patrick Chase
Member
July 25th, 2020

In other news, the laws of physics still apply.

Seriously, AFAIK there are no similarly compact, full-frame, fanless, sealed cameras that can shoot oversampled 4K continuously without overheating. The 1Dx III can as Johnnie says (I have one and can vouch for that fact as well) but that’s a much heftier body that can better absorb and dissipate heat. The S1H also can, but it uses a fan. The A7R[3,4] are both susceptible to overheating even in their respective oversampled APS-C modes (I have a 3 and have rented the 4 several times).

Also, a lot of the replies in this thread focus on the “time-to-overheat” in the infamous Canon document, but that only tells you how long it takes to get into trouble from a “cold” start. For the sort of sustained shooting Johnnie was doing you need to think instead in terms of duty cycle, i.e. what percentage of the time can the camera shoot when used as much as possible over the course of an entire day. The Canon doc doesn’t give us those numbers for the R6, but it does tell is that the R5 is good for ~40% duty cycle in its 8K mode (the doc says can shoot for another 8 minutes after resting for 20 following an overheat). If you’re on the clock with precious talent then that’s probably not going to be OK (depending on whether you’re shooting “documentary-style” or with a lot of setup between shots).

I’m actually more optimistic about the R5. The fact that the sensor is exactly double 4K resolution means that it should be able to pixel-bin “evenly” (i.e. lump the same number of physical pixels for every output), and that in turn should give it decent footage quality even in the overheat-immune “non-oversampled” 4K30 mode (by “decent” I mean better than a simple 4K Bayer sensor, but worse than oversampled). Whether Canon implemented such an evenly binned clocking mode will be perhaps the single most important thing to look at about that camera.

Roger
Roger
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Patrick Chase

This is good information, thank you.

If we’re considering APS-C modes, throw in the Sony a6600 for consideration. It has no recording limit for 4K in a very compact body. The electronics seem more efficient than previous generations so you get full screen brightness. I’ve yet to get it to overheat in video mode.

 Patrick Chase
Patrick Chase
Member
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Roger

Smaller sensors generate less heat, which was really sort of the underlying point of my comment. There are several APS-C platforms that can do 4K30 with little or no overheating, and the GH5 with its m43 sensor does very well indeed in my experience.

Actually the GH5 is a really good illustrative example: The m43 sensor generates less heat to begin with, and its small size left Panasonic more space to implement thermal mitigations (separate video processor, improved “channeling” to the case, etc). Between those two they were able to implement a camera with thermally-limited performance that’s still on the leading edge 3 years later.

It’s probably worth noting that the R5 also has an “overheat-immune” APS-C mode (per Canon’s specs) that outputs 4K30 from oversampled 5.1K. Less active pixels and less area means less power.

TBH for me (I’m not a professional videographer, and I have a 1Dx III to take up the slack if I do want to go crazy) the value proposition for the R5 still looks valid, assuming Canon did a good job with the default 4K30 mode as I outlined in my previous post. Its advanced video modes are really attractive for some of the stuff I do, and I wouldn’t want to pay for (or carry) something that can mitigate the heat for 100% duty cycle use. As Johnnie says it’s about knowing yourself and your requirements and choosing the right tool[s] for the job.

Denny
Denny
Guest
July 26th, 2020
Reply to  Patrick Chase

Actually, it seems like the non-HQ-4K on the R5 is line-skipped, not pixel binned. Gerald Undone has some sample images, that show significantly more noise and jaggy artifacts.

 Patrick Chase
Patrick Chase
Member
July 26th, 2020
Reply to  Denny

Ugh, that’s unfortunate. Sounds like they passed up a significant opportunity there.

I honestly don’t understand why manufacturers employ line-skipping as much as they do with CMOS sensors. With CCD you had to do so because the only way to get data off the sensor was by clocking the entire line through the output stage. With CMOS you can basically get any set of pixels you want, potentially with charge-summing (“binning”), assuming you design the right wiring into the sensor. Sony have used this to great effect in the 4K FF modes in the A7R[34], which are worse than their oversampled modes but still better than they would get by line-skipping (I have this pet theory that there was a bug in the initial version of the 42MP sensor that forced them to skip in the A7R2, but that was fixed by the time the A7R3 came around).

So if that’s true with final HW/FW then it would appear that if you want high-quality 4K without overheating on the R5 you have to go to the 5.1K oversampled APS-C mode. That isn’t the end of the world (the A7R[34] require similar cropping to get their best 4K output, and those modes can overheat) but it’s less than I’d hoped for. Sounds like my (adapted) Sigma 18-35 will soldier on into the RF era (I currently use it with the S35 video modes on my A7R3, 1Dx III, and BMPCC6K).

Denny
Denny
Guest
July 26th, 2020
Reply to  Patrick Chase

What could be the potential reason for not employing pixel binning? Was it too much effort to (re-)design the sensor? Was pixel-binning maybe also going to cause heat problems in comparison to line-skipping?

daniele ciraolo
Guest
July 26th, 2020
Reply to  Patrick Chase

438/5000
I also remember that the R5 has a magnesium body that works as a heat sink, moreover the r5 if it turns off due to overheating you can turn it back on immediately and use the 4k mode at 30p full frame non hq or 4k crop mode immediately without any waiting! In addition, if you ventilate the rear part and during breaks, you open the door to the Cfexpress card, the battery door and you remove the lens and use the USB fans to cool down quickly.

Eduardo
Guest
July 25th, 2020

Thanks Johnnie. Do you set overheat control on? the movie size and frame rate are automatically changed while the camera is in standby according to Canon

The DP Journey
Guest
July 25th, 2020

Love seeing honest filmmakers talk about their experience and offering genuine feedback. Respect to you guys

Roger
Roger
Guest
July 25th, 2020

Cheers from Kamakura, I recognized a lot of familiar places. Is Neal doing catering or anything else where we can try his cooking? It looks wonderful.

The camera doesn’t seem worth trying to get to work for documentary or events. There are better options out there without the recording time limits. It’s too bad as I’d like to see Canon be relevant again for video (I started with a Canon DSLR back in the early years of DSLR video).

Roger
Roger
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Johnnie Behiri

Thanks Johnnie, that sounds good.

I’ve also put the cookbook on my list to buy. I love shojin ryori and hope to experience it more (post-pandemic).

Trev
Trev
Guest
July 25th, 2020

Did you try filming in RAW? It’s probably less demanding than running H265 encoding. Might not overheat in the same way.

Trev
Trev
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Trev

Ah, my mistake. I was under the impression the R6 had RAW shooting modes too. I’d still be curious to see what the R5 does.

 Karim Yatrib
Member
July 25th, 2020

nice job as usual Johnnie

jon
jon
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Karim Yatrib

yes

Anon
Anon
Guest
July 25th, 2020

If you need a video camera, buy a video camera…this review is dumb imo. Didn’t make any mention of its photo taking capabilities etc. I get this is video camera website but again..the R6 is not a video camera.
It’s a camera, that has the ability to shoot video, not a video camera that can shoot photos too.

Adam
Adam
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Anon

Don’t tell Armando on YouTube! He swears every Canon camera, mirrorless, DSLR or the C100 are not only ready, but are being used on feature productions every day. He Doesn’t see why a camera shutting down every 20 minutes is a big deal because that is what it takes to change film on an IMAX camera. I am not kidding. He said that.

I agree with you. It is the customers setting these insane expectations for cameras that are for taking photographs Canon didn’t make them to be cinema cameras so stop being disappointed that they aren’t, never were and aren’t going to be. Thanks for throwing some sense out there my man.

Mike
Mike
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Anon

Hi Anon

The most of media production today is made for the internet. If you own your own company you will have heard your accountant telling that you shuld only invest in what is really nesasery for the job if you want a good economy for your company. If there is a demand from the customers for explecit equipment they have to pay for it, and it has to be a very huge production if it is cheaper to buy than to rent. The only colleagues I know who have your opinion, is employed and do not have to think about money, someone else decides for them.
So it is very relevant to test the little brother of Canons new mirrorless flagship, hundreds of professionel photographers use them every day. Not only for the internet, The Norwegian TV series “Skam” which has been re-maked in several countries including US was entirely shot on Sony 7S2

…And Hi Adam

How many products do you think is being made on IMax?

Mike
Mike
Guest
July 25th, 2020

Thanks for your real live test, and a nice little documentary film, a pity it was not possible to make it longere.
Judging by the ice pack, I guess the camera body got pretty hot, otherwise there was the possibility that Canon has been too conservative with the “over heating turn off” system. I was very interested in the Nikon Z6 -until I saw several examples of aliasing, and strange flicker on most ISO settings (in RAW which apparently have not disappeared with new software updates). Therefore, I was hoping for Canon which I have been happy with in the past. I need better monitor and workflow (direct editing from SSD and no intermedia conversion) so I use a Ninja V. On my Sony it seems like it relieves the camera very much, but I do not want to take the chance with 6R, nor am I aware of whether it has a clean output at all. I guess the distortion of parts of the sound is due to the fact that you totally lost concentration, when I heard your story I remembered a similar very unpleasant experience I have done everything to suppress (and of course avoid – it was not a test!) .
Thank you for your serious tests which are also always interesting in terms of content.

 Larry Segwell
Larry Segwell
Member
July 24th, 2020

Wow, after 6 years Canon finally gives their customers a mirrorless camera that does 1080p/120fps, H-265 and non-cropped 4K video, among a few other things. Thank you Samsung for the NX1.

Victor Leung
Victor Leung
Guest
July 27th, 2020
Reply to  Larry Segwell

Is NX1 a full frame?

Dan Brockett
Dan Brockett
Guest
July 24th, 2020

That is disappointing. I was liking the specs and cost of this camera over the R5 but never mind. I shoot the same sorts of projects and documentaries as Johnnie, there is no way I could work within these limitations without frustration.

Mr Pickles
Mr Pickles
Guest
July 24th, 2020

Canon mirrorless is not for videographers and never will be. The R6 has video but not for videographers. The main 8k video mode has been designed for photographers who want to do long full frame photo bursts and then select one frame / photo at the full Raw quality. Photographers will be using the 8k video mode for maybe 20 seconds at a time max. So photographers will never hit the max video record limit (of 10 minutes) and thus will not have the over-heating problems.

If you are shooting video and want to shoot on Canon then you use their dedicated video cameras xc50 / c100 mk2 / c200 / c300 mk2 / c500 mk2… (not a hybrid mirrorless photo camera).

Adam
Adam
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Mr Pickles

Canon Fans…expect More!!! This is so sad seeing people asking all these insane questions like, “what about the low heat mode? Did you hold it by a fan? Did you ice it? Did it over heat in HD 8 FPS? I only do 2
Minute takes anyway”. Please, stop it. The product should work. It’s not a cinema camera or even a video camera, stop trying to make it into one. But please, don’t justify accepting this camera which literally doesn’t function. Stop trying to make that “OK”
Somehow. It isn’t. And it shouldn’t be. Rise up, demand a working camera instead of forking over thousands for a nonfunctional piece of metal and plastic. Every other camera companies’ Latest gen cameras at least stay on. Haha.

Oliver
Oliver
Guest
August 3rd, 2020
Reply to  Mr Pickles

Why then different framerates like 24, 25, 29,30?? Imho you are completely wrong. You try to tell, what you wish is the truth, but it is not.
Canon R5 and R6 aim for people doing videostuff and/or photostuff. And all the photograhers complaining about that, wont change anything!

Gabor
Guest
July 24th, 2020

Canon advised that to shoot without overheating you need to use “normal” mode instead of HQ mode. Which is still a bummer as it is line skipping (if I remember well).
Did you try that or with HQ mode? I am just curious though, I am not on the Canonwagon, because I use a different system.

Roger
Roger
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Gabor

Gabor, you might be thinking of the R5 which does pixel binning vs downscaling from the 8K.

BOUNCE
Member
July 24th, 2020

Hi Johnnie, it’s disappointing to hear about this. I’m certain we all had high hopes that the overheating was not going to be a issue in real world use. Clearly, this is not the case. We can only wish that the body you used was malfunctioning and not the norm.

Benjamin
Benjamin
Guest
July 24th, 2020

Cmon everybody, obviously Canon is not going to deliver anything serious for filmmakers without spending at least a fortune, I really don’t get why people keep expecting that Canon is going to change their philosophy and deliver anything serious in this range. Canon is clearly a fossil company, we have companies like Blackmagic and ZCam among many others delivering what we actually need for a very low price!!!
the strategy from Canon is actually very simple, lets put a big number like 8K and spend a fortune promoting the camera to a new generation of YouTubers that sadly don’t have a clue about almost anything in regards to professional equipment using these flashy and very popish filmmakers with millions of followers.

Great review btw!

Adam
Adam
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Benjamin

This is a great point. Don’t know a single pro who is looking at YouTube to see what products to use. These aren’t cameras for people who make a living with their cameras for video. Not only in features or commercials but even a wedding with these kind of limitations.

These are hobbyist/vlogging cameras and other than probably taking a mean photo with beautiful RF glass, it isn’t for pros. You can always spot them when their first concern is autofocus. Other than documentaries, no pro is using autofocus for video. Period. (Maybe low end corporate stuff or a crash cam actually…my bad) but you get the point.

Turns off after 20 minutes and had primarily the same codecs as your iPhone = not designed to be a pro video camera. That’s it. I just don’t understand why canon fans want it to be one so badly. Canon didn’t want it to be that or they would have designed it that way.

Colin Daggitt
Colin Daggitt
Member
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Benjamin

What’s the battery life on a Black Magic Design pocket camera? An hour? Sensor size? I don’t want a micro 4 thirds. Auto-focus? Non existent. All the above are better on a Canon. BM? Sexy, but useless?

Michael Krauss
Guest
July 24th, 2020

How long did it take for the R6 to overheat? I was thinking this would be the perfect dedicated gimbal camera, great AF – shoots are not usually that long. I would primarily be shooting at 4K 60P.

Member
July 24th, 2020

I was also looking forward to the R5… this is concerning… :(
Guess we may have to stick with Sony for another generation…

Jack Kelner
Jack Kelner
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Kenneth Chan

Or get a Panasonic SH1 and a Ninja.

Juan Miguel
Guest
July 24th, 2020

The canon idea is sad. useless expectations

 Mark Dobson
Mark Dobson
Member
July 24th, 2020

Hi Johnnie,

Thank for so much for your review. I always like the unusual subject matters you choose to profile and such a shame you couldn’t make this short film without encountering the heat issues that stopped your workflow in a live situation with real people who have allocated time to work with you. The actual film you produced was great and no one looking at it would imagine the difficulties you had to deal with. I especially liked that, at the end, you sat down to to share the meal we had seen being prepared with your interviewee and his mentor.

I had not imagined that problems such as you encountered could occur with these new cameras. That’s the R5 and R6. Sure we could accept issues with working with 8k and we have been warned of heat issues but I though they would only occur with extended length shots not the type of shots you were capturing, short cutaways and background shots

I’ve got an R5 on pre-order and think the wisest thing to do would be to put the order on hold until other experienced film makers such as you have given feedback of working with the camera on real world documentary type productions because to encounter problems such as you did would be impossible for the type of live action situations that I film. No chance to redo things or to wait for a camera to cool down enough to start again. The whole point of filming with these small cameras is to able to be responsive and agile and not to be worrying about whether the camera is going to stop working at any moment.

Thanks again.

John T Reynolds
John T Reynolds
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Johnnie Behiri

Nice article and timely information to a lot of us. Physics will prevail in small form factors. My only criticism is (being an old time wedding photographer) where was your backup equipment? I never do any job without a second body. Not trying to be disrespectful, but I would have abandoned the test to keep the flow going. Anyway I always admire your site and insightful articles. Thanks again

Abner Deenright
Abner Deenright
Member
July 24th, 2020

Disappointing review if you can call it that. Testing a non professional hybrid camera and then moaning it didn’t work the way it wasn’t design to do.
Really disappointed in Cinema5D. Seems more like click bait for the sake of it.
Get a pro video camera for shooting documentaries like proper documentary makers.

Member
July 24th, 2020

That sounds like an excuse for Canon. They shouldn’t get a pass as they have for the last few generations when Sony, Panasonic and all the others have released hybrid cameras that have been used solely for video shooting without so many limitations. Look at the name of the site, Cinema 5D! Where do you think that came from? Canon was the one who started the DSLR video revolution (although by accident) with the 5D mark ii but it’s a shame they never fully embraced it.

Abner Deenright
Abner Deenright
Member
July 24th, 2020
Reply to  Kenneth Chan

Excusing someone using a non Pro hybrid camera for pro work as an a camera?
Right? I’ll let that sink in. Sad day indeed.

Jack Kelner
Jack Kelner
Guest
July 25th, 2020

Apologists cry so hard when flaws are pointed out in their pet product. Did the review make you feel bad? Need a blankie?

Jack Kelner
Jack Kelner
Guest
July 25th, 2020

“Testing a non professional hybrid camera and then moaning it didn’t work the way it wasn’t design to do.”

Standard apologist excuse. You forgot to add, “He was holding it wrong.”

Member
July 24th, 2020

This was such a great documentary I forgot all about the camera, great work. I want to visit Japan now. What a bummer about the camera because the images look great. I wonder if they will ever be able to fix that.

Jayden Eric Beaudoin
Guest
July 24th, 2020

Wondering how overheating was when shooting at 1080p and not 4k? I preordered the R6 but I doubt I’ll be doing much 4K as I’m more into the photo side. It would be a huge disaster to have time limits when shooting 1080p60 though.

Osama
Osama
Guest
July 24th, 2020

How much time did you get at 4k/24p before overheating? Canon advertises 40 minutes, Did you get anywhere near that ?

Raymond Ramos
Raymond Ramos
Guest
July 24th, 2020

How long would you say the over heating happened? 30 minute into the interview? And how long was the actually recovery? Thanks.

Tim Shoebridge
Guest
July 24th, 2020

Brilliant open and honest review as always Johnnie, and beautiful story-telling despite all those limitations and frustrations. As much as I applaud Canon for seeming to take mirrorless video seriously, I have to wonder who they got to test this camera earlier in its development cycle. My guess is this camera’s release was the decision of men in suits with spreadsheets rather than professionals in the video field…

Mustafa Ali
Mustafa Ali
Guest
July 24th, 2020

How long were you able to shoot before it overheated ? Really interested in knowing the pattern. Thanks!

 Richard James Milne
Richard James Milne
Member
July 24th, 2020

This didn’t surprise me! I had my suspicions however overheating would be one of the major downfalls for Cannon and the R series cameras. The R series camera series I see used by rich hobbies that only want that odd 2 minute clip and do mostly photography. I cannot see any Professionals on the video side choosing a camera that isn’t stable! I’ve been here, done that, when working with the Sony A7 series cameras 3 years ago. That’s when I sold all my Nikon, Canon, Sony, and Hasselblad systems after I moved to Panasonic. Since then… I’ve had “NO ISSUES”! A reliable stable platform that even today (GH series) 3 years after it’s release. is one of the most reliable, smallest, affordable, camera systems that’s a true 4K 10bit shooters that I can use all day along without an external recorder. I feel sorry for the buyers that have preordered this one wanting to use it as their workhorse, or possibility worse… the Canon R5.

Good luck Canon, you’re going to need it!!

Barry Goyette
Guest
July 24th, 2020

Two questions. Any Idea what the ambient temperature was when you had overheating issues? Did you convo with Canon regarding the overheating of a PP sample camera, and did they have anything to say? I’ll agree things don’t sound good if the camera is overheating in 4k at a normal frame.

Member
July 24th, 2020

It is possible that shooting n a 4K crop apsc mode would have been an alternate solution to dealing with the overheating.

Member
July 24th, 2020

Hi Johnnie. I know pre-production sample cameras that exhibited the same issue were sent out in the U.K. and it turned out they were body samples only, and weren’t meant to be filmed with. It sounds like you’ve received a similar unit! Clearly Canon won’t ship a new camera that overheats in 4K 24p!

Member
July 24th, 2020
Reply to  Johnnie Behiri

I’m really well, thanks mate. I’m gutted that you’ve experienced these problems with the R6. As you know, Canon have traditionally been very conservative about adding features to their cameras, lest those features compromise IQ or usability. I don’t believe that ethos has changed, so can only assume something else is at play here.

Jack Kelner
Jack Kelner
Guest
July 25th, 2020

” very conservative about adding features to their cameras, lest those features compromise IQ or usability”

Or lest they cannibalize sales of their more-expensive cameras.

They conserved themselves right out of the top of the market… and still haven’t learned better. Too bad, because Sony has been troweling out pathetic 8-bit video for eons, leaving Canon a real opportunity.

Let’s hope Canon adds raw output at least.

anulu
anulu
Guest
July 25th, 2020

Canon statement is clear about R6 will overheat in all modescomment image

Roger
Roger
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  anulu

Canon’s statement is clear that two modes “are not limited by heat” and they have not included 4K 24 in this chart for some reason.

Denny
Denny
Guest
July 24th, 2020

Hey Johnnie,
how long were you average takes? Did you record shorter snippets and accumulated heat over time or did you record longer takes close to the official recording limit?

JakeJY
JakeJY
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Johnnie Behiri

Do you have a ballpark number or can you tell from the times of the clips that were recorded before it overheated? I think people are most curious if it matches the claimed 40 minutes or not (camera also stops recording at 29m59s so should be easy tell if it gets past). Also were you using H.265 or H.264 (or alternatively were you using C-log, I see HDR was off)?

Also any ballpark numbers for recovery times (Canon seems to claim 10 minutes for another 5 minutes of 4K60p although unlisted for 4K24p)?

Denny
Denny
Guest
July 26th, 2020
Reply to  Johnnie Behiri

It’s a shame, because the footage you shot is really nice. It seems the maximum recording time can be extended about 2,5-3 times with an external recorder. Do you think you could have coped with that (probably hard to say, I guess)?

mps
mps
Guest
July 24th, 2020

now thats quite a bummer… was super excited for the r6

 Stephen Kraus
Stephen Kraus
Member
July 24th, 2020

Yeah the Canon R6 is always oversampling (as opposed to the R5 which only oversamples in certain modes). Still though – this is really a bummer and proves that the R6 is not a practical storytelling tool. Hoping the R5 overheating can be worked around (i.e. interviews in non-oversampled modes, short burst b-roll for everything else)

Member
July 24th, 2020

I applaud Canon for pushing the boundaries of what its new products can do. But as you illustrate, a major mistake not providing a reliable 4k recording option. The oversampled 4k looks amazing, but it appears to only be a reliable HD cam at this point. I anticipate (or hope, rather) Canon releases a firmware update that implements:
1. 4k pixelbining mode
2. Cropped 4k mode like the R (or is this already on the R6?)

Three options for different shooting needs. Personally, I’d be quite happy with that.

And finally, maybe this demonstrates the need for a C100 III (Or R100?). C100 II body but with RF mount, touch LCD, DPAF II, and R5 videos specs minus the 8k/raw. Leave everything else the same :)

Jordi Martí
Jordi Martí
Member
July 24th, 2020
Reply to  Carl S. Miller

Yes! I really want to see the C100 III with R mount. I’m a C100 II user, and face autofocus only works with STM lenses. This makes it very hard to work with. I don’t even need a strong codec, only a reasonably priced C100 with 4K and latest autofocus technology from Canon.

 Jordan Parker
Jordan Parker
Member
July 24th, 2020

I’ve used the Canon T2i, 7D mk i, 6D mki, and the Sony A7Sii over the years. All of these have overheating issues in certain environments. The 7D and A7sii specifically don’t like recording on a warm day (80F or higher). Even scattered b-roll shooting will overheat these two fairly quickly. However, in each case, the problem was fixed by using a battery grip. On brand or off, moving the battery out of the camera body took a lot of thermal build-up away from the sensor, and significantly delayed or eliminated overheat warnings and shutdowns.

I’m hoping the same is true here, and since I prefer to shoot with a grip anyway this isn’t an “extra” expense in my case.

Abe Halpert
Abe Halpert
Guest
July 24th, 2020

Yes – there is no pixel-binned 4K mode for the R6 to fall back on to avoid heating like the R5, correct? I believe that the R5 can record indefinitely in 4K24P in its non-HQ mode

Matt Uhry
Guest
July 24th, 2020

This is sad news, I was really excited for the R5, mostly for the AF with EF mount lenses and juicy Canon colors and 10 bit. ( been using Sony for a bit as my small cameras ) The overheating reports sounded like something I could live with until now.

Do you happen to know if the R6 has 24P HQ mode and if you were in it or not ? That might have some effect on the overheating.

Thanks,
Matt Uhry
http://www.vimeo.com/mattuhry

 Sparky McLenscap
Sparky McLenscap
Member
July 24th, 2020

Meh. Too little, too late. Ya lost me, Canon.

 Giovanni Lorini
Member
July 24th, 2020

Hi Johnnie,
very sad about the test result, hope that Canon could fix the issue. You are very polite in your comments, people often don’t think a minute about how many work, peoples, families are behind a product.

Do you tried to use the overeating menu, I suppose it slow down the processing/sensor in standby ?
I read about it somewhere so I don’t know exactly the menu item.
Anyway in my opinion It is very strange the release of a camera with such limitations. I don’t know what went wrong with it.

 theo antoniou
theo antoniou
Member
July 24th, 2020

I find it really strange that a major player like Canon would release products with such serious problems/shortcomings.
Many pundits fop it off by saying they’re primarily “stills cameras.”
However, there’s no doubt that the R5/R6 cameras have been touted as a serious video tools.
If the upcoming Sony A7S3 can take the heat, then Canon have a really big problem.

Chris
Chris
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  theo antoniou

Sony users have lived with these issues for years ?

 Mason Hest
Member
July 24th, 2020

This is the type of review I wanted to hear and see. Thank you for actually going out into the field and using this camera for how someone would actually use it and not being a Canon ambassador on YouTube or being like someone at EOS HD where you just sit and complain about specs without any actual real world use. I own quite a lot of camera equipment as I am a self-employed cinematographer and photographer and I have been curious about the R5 and they are six and whether I would potentially get one of those or another 1D. Me personally I don’t care if the camera has a mirror or is mirrorless but I have been very weary ever since using Sony mirror less bodies when it comes to overheating and their reliability. I know Sony has gotten a lot better but canon I believe has a long way to go so thank you for taking the time and giving a very honest real world review, I always appreciate your reviews and your blogs so again I thank you.

Kamuran akkor
Kamuran akkor
Guest
July 24th, 2020
Reply to  Mason Hest

But for how long? He doesn’t tell us this. After 5 minutes? After 30 minutes?

Guest
July 27th, 2020
Reply to  Johnnie Behiri

Give us a break with the stop watch comments. Nobody expects a filmmaker to time his shoot. What we do expect is for him to give approximate info and feedback after shooting with a camera that is known to have thermal time limits. Coming off a shoot, you know roughly for how long the camera was turned on for, and whether it was turned on in-between takes or turned off. You know what day it is right? You know how many hours there are in a day, you know roughly that the shoot started in the morning and ended in the afternoon. So put it in the article maybe? The people sitting next to a keyboard complaining that I sit in a chair complaining – I do wonder if they realise the irony of that, let alone the hypocrisy! It only takes a single click on EOSHD to go through to my filmmaking and creative work, there are videos and photos all over the blog and in almost every camera review I’ve done. For somebody to have the cheek to suggest I don’t shoot and don’t have a talent – well, they must realise how that comes off and how that makes them look, and I include Johnnie in that too because he’s a master at it. All my reviews are real-world experiences and I have given detailed feedback to camera companies on numerous occasions including Panasonic, Sony, Fujifilm, Sigma and Leica. Never to Canon because I no longer use their latest cameras and won’t be using an EOS R5 in my filmmaking either unless it starts performing as it’s advertised. I think it should be a consumer class action lawsuit if it doesn’t.

Guest
July 27th, 2020
Reply to  Johnnie Behiri

If there is anything positive, it is that we agree 100%. The camera isn’t fit for purpose.

jay francis
jay francis
Guest
July 30th, 2020
Reply to  Andrew Reid

You actually mean “The camera – as in that specific one, not that model – WAS not fit for purpose.” It was a pre-production model; the problem might be fixed in shipping ones. I wouldn’t assume that – but assuming the opposite is wrong (and unprofessional) too.

Jack Kelner
Jack Kelner
Guest
July 25th, 2020
Reply to  Mason Hest

I guess this is why external recorders still exist.

Jonathan Palfrey
Jonathan Palfrey
Guest
July 24th, 2020

That’s really concerning. 4K24p really shouldn’t be pushing the camera that hard. Thank you for doing this real world shoot with it, far more realistic use of the camera than vlogs and other tests.

I was really looking forward to getting an R6 however now unless they figure out how to make a huge improvement an A7Siii or even an A7iii might be better hybrid options.